Former Kremlin Foreign Policy Advisor Karaganov: We Are In A New More Perilous Cold War

Sergey Karaganov (Source: Karaganov.ru)

 

Former Kremlin Foreign Policy Advisor Sergey Karaganov stated that the world is living in a new Cold War, which is worse than the previous one.[1] “Nowadays the risk of war is much greater than in the past. One of the reasons is that there is no system of agreements, no hot lines and no channels for consultation between the defense ministries. We have prevented a war in Europe by disrupting plans to involve Ukraine into Western alliances. If Ukraine had become a member of NATO, a war would have become unavoidable,” said Karaganov.

He further stated that Russia and China are the “main providers of security” in the world today, explaining that China is providing economic security, while Russia is providing military-strategic security. According to Karaganov, Europe is becoming increasingly focused on itself, while America is destabilizing the world. He then added that multipolarity that Russia had vigorously promoted in order to destroy the unipolar American system is no longer a goal in itself. “Now it is just a transitional period in the history of international relations,” said Karaganov.

Following are excerpts from Karaganov’s interview:[2]

Russia And China Are The Main Providers Of Security In The World Today

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Bill Gates compares Trump to the assassinated Kennedy

Bill Gates compares Trump to the assassinated Kennedy

President-elect Donald Trump and President John F. Kennedy, Source: Reuters, image creation Edward Szall/TRUNEWS

 

Was Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates delivering an inspiring compliment or a veiled threat? 

  • President John Fitzgerald “Jack” Kennedy was assassinated on November 23rd 1963.
  • Kennedy’s presidency is known as a turbulent time, including the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Bay of Pigs Invasion, the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, the establishment of the Peace Corps, developments in the Space Race, the building of the Berlin Wall, the Trade Expansion Act to lower tariffs, and the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Kennedy was best known for challenging the deeply rooted military industrial complex and old guard political elite. Continue reading

MOSCOW ON THE OFFENSIVE: Russian state newspapers predict ‘direct military conflict’ with US as it compares Syria stalemate to Cuban missile crisis

 

‘Third World War’ fears have been voiced by the newspapers over the growing tensions between the USA and Syria

A RUSSIAN newspaper fears a Third World War with the US over Syria.

Tabloid Moskovsky Komsomolets predicts a “direct military confrontation” on par with the Cuban Missile Crisis.

The US  suspended contact with Russia over Syria on Monday. Continue reading

The Coming Siege

Wisdom from 2006 with a lesson for today’s times:

 

https://images.thetrumpet.com/52e938e3!h.360,id.9957,m.fit,w.640

The United States willingness to forfeit the Panama Canal it built, shows America and Britain’s irrational desire to yield. (RODRIGO ARANGUA/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Any world power with vast overseas commitments must control the seaways necessary for safe passage of its goods, its citizens and its military forces. Why then have Britain and America so casually yielded up this power they once guarded so jealously?

Geography is the most stable factor on which the power of a nation depends.

Two thirds of the Earth’s surface is ocean. Two thirds of its inhabited land embraces the great land mass of Eurasia and Africa. The remainder, which we call the Western Hemisphere, is, by comparison, an island in the midst of the oceans.

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Like Iran, pacts with USSR ignored foe’s behavior

Complaints nuke deal must demand Tehran change conduct ignore long history of arms control accords with Cold War enemy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Critics of the Iran nuclear deal claim it is flawed, among many reasons, because it does not demand that Tehran also change its behavior at home and abroad. That complaint ignores the United States’ long history of striking arms control agreements with the Soviet Union, a far more dangerous enemy.

Dating as far back as the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963 — less than a year after the Cuban missile crisis — US administrations engaged the Soviet Union in agreements to limit nuclear threats while not linking deals to abhorrent Soviet human rights abuses and the active arming and funding of leftist, anti-American revolutionary movements around the world. Continue reading

Former Soviet spy: We created Liberation Theology

Ion Mihai Pacepa on Raul Castro’s yacht in Cuba, 1974. Photo courtesy of Ion Mihai Pacepa.

 

 

.- Espionage deep in the heart of Europe. Secrets in the KGB. Defection from a communist nation. Ion Mihai Pacepa has seen his share of excitement, serving as general for Communist Romania’s secret police before defecting to the United States in the late 1970s.

The highest-ranking defector from communism in the ‘70s, he spoke to CNA recently about the connection between the Soviet Union and Liberation Theology in Latin America. Below are excerpts of the interview. All footnotes were provided by Pacepa.

In general, could you say that the spreading of Liberation Theology had any kind of Soviet connection?

Yes. I learned the fine points of the KGB involvement with Liberation Theology from Soviet General Aleksandr Sakharovsky, communist Romania’s chief razvedka (foreign intelligence) adviser – and my de facto boss, until 1956, when he became head of the Soviet espionage service, the PGU1,  a position he held for an unprecedented record of 15 years.

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Cuban fiasco: Obama throws a lifeline to an imploding, tyrannical, bankrupt regime

Lest we already forget what Raúl Castro mentioned months ago: The Communist revolution is basically triumphant because nothing had to change to make America open the floodgates.

 

In that simplistic jargon characterizing President Barack Hussein Obama’s worldwide “transformation” of U.S. foreign policy, the chief argument for his Cuban shift has been “[T]hese 50 years have shown that isolation has not worked.”

In the facts of history, in this as in so many other instances, Obama is wrong.

The fact is that U.S. policy toward Cuba, with its ups and downs, has been generally successful. Continue reading

The most dangerous day

The American citizenry might be shocked to learn (or typically dismiss) that this is now the second most dangerous day, as they have been reinstalled. The year is 2012, the threat has reemerged, people do not get the real news anymore and have been lulled into a calming false sense of security.

On October 27, 2012 the world commemorates the 50th anniversary of what has been called the most dangerous day in world history. It was on Saturday 27th October, 1962 that the Cuban missile crisis involving the two superpowers – the US and the former Soviet Union – reached a fever pitch. The confrontation had started with the detection of Soviet medium-range ballistic missiles by an American photo-reconnaissance U-2 flight over Cuba which information was conveyed to US President John F. Kennedy on October 16, 1962. The end of the crisis dates to October 28, 1962 when the Soviets agreed to withdraw their missiles and nuclear warheads from Cuba in exchange for an American undertaking not to invade Cuba, along with a secret offer by the US to remove its missiles installed in Turkey at a later date. Continue reading

A Soviet missile base in Germany that spy planes never saw

It is still the hardest place to find. A glade down an overgrown path which seems like any other clearing in the endless woods of Brandenburg. But on its floor, there is a strip of concrete half the size of a tennis court, with a metal plate in the middle.

This is the launch-pad for a nuclear attack on Western Europe. Soviet nuclear missiles 20 times more powerful than Hiroshima were set up here, primed to be fired at targets including London and nuclear bases in eastern England. Continue reading