How the U.S. Is Vulnerable to Terrorism in Space

Space terrorism is a growing threat to U.S. national security, according to a new report.

And an attack on a U.S. satellite—or damage to one from another country’s debris—could have astronomical effects on national security, says the report from the Council on Foreign Relations. Continue reading

Japan’s indigenous stealth fighter to fly this year amid arms race worries

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Development of ATD-X jet part of Tokyo’s effort to upgrade its defence capabilities; analysts warn it could spark claims of arms race in Asia

A prototype of Japan’s first domestically produced stealth fighter will get airborne before the end of the year, a significant development in Tokyo’s efforts to improve its defence capabilities.

Known as the Advanced Technology Demonstrator-X (ATD-X) fighter, the aircraft is being developed by the defence ministry’s research institute and a number of private companies, primarily Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Continue reading

DHS study: North Korea capable of EMP attack on U.S.

As mentioned here before, imagine what normally looks like and passes as a satellite that has already been orbiting earth and hanging over the United States for quite some time, and is ready to drop out of the sky on command. The country would be less ready for that than an attack from the South or East. There would be virtually no defense against such an attack with the exception of a preemptive strike.

Long-suppressed report concludes communist nation can deliver on threats

WASHINGTON – A long-suppressed report prepared by the Department of Homeland Security for the Defense Department concludes that North Korea could deliver on its threats to destroy the United States with a nuclear electromagnetic pulse attack.

The report remains blocked from release to the American public.

However, a copy obtained by Peter Vincent Pry from sources within DHS finds North Korea could use its Unha-3 space launch vehicle to deliver a nuclear warhead as a satellite over the South Pole to attack the U.S. from the south.

Pry, executive director of the congressional advisory Task Force on National and Homeland Security, pointed out that the U.S. “has no early warning radars or interceptors” to stop a missile from the south. Continue reading

Japan to intercept any North Korea missile deemed a threat

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan will strike any North Korean ballistic missile that threatens to hit Japan in the coming weeks after Pyongyang recently fired medium-range missiles, a government source said on Saturday.

Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera issued the order, which took effect on Thursday and runs through April 25, the day that marks the founding of North Korea’s army, the source told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

Following the order, meant “to prepare for any additional missile launches,” a destroyer was dispatched to the Sea of Japan and will fire if North Korea launches a missile that Tokyo deems in danger of striking or falling on Japanese territory, the source said. Continue reading

North Korea tells world ‘wait and see’ on new nuclear test

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) – North Korea said on Friday that the world would have to “wait and see” when asked for details of “a new form” of nuclear test it threatened to carry out after the United Nations Security Council condemned Pyongyang’s recent ballistic missile launch.

North Korea fired two medium-range Rodong ballistic missiles into the sea on March 26. Its first firing in four years of mid-range missiles that can hit Japan followed a series of short-range rocket launches over the past two months.

Members of the Security Council on March 27 condemned the move as a violation of U.N. resolutions and that it would continue discussions on an “appropriate response.

North Korea (DPRK) reacted on Sunday with a threat to conduct what it called “a new form of nuclear test.

“The DPRK made it very clear, we will carry out a new form of nuclear test. But I recommend you to wait and see what it is,” North Korea’s Deputy U.N. Ambassador Ri Tong Il said on Friday during the normally reclusive state’s third U.N. news conference this year. Continue reading

Koreas Trade Fire; Island Residents in Shelters

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — North and South Korea fired hundreds of artillery shells into each other’s waters Monday in a flare-up of animosity that forced residents of five front-line South Korean islands to evacuate to shelters for several hours, South Korean officials said.

The exchange of fire into the Yellow Sea followed Pyongyang’s sudden announcement that it would conduct live-fire drills in seven areas north of the Koreas’ disputed maritime boundary. North Korea routinely test-fires artillery and missiles into the ocean but rarely discloses those plans in advance. The announcement was seen as an expression of Pyongyang’s frustration at making little progress in its recent push to win outside aid.

North Korea fired 500 rounds of artillery shells over more than three hours, about 100 of which fell south of the sea boundary, South Korean Defense Ministry spokesman Kim Min-seok said. South Korea responded by firing 300 shells into North Korean waters, he said. Continue reading

Pacific Cmdr.: U.S. lacks ability to conduct successful amphibious assaults

The head of U.S. Pacific Command believes America does not possess the capacity to conduct amphibious assaults in the wake of a crisis, as it did during World War II.

“We have had a good return of our Marines back to the Asia-Pacific, particularly as the activities in the Middle East wind down in Afghanistan. … But the reality is, is that to get Marines around effectively, they require all types of lift. They require the big amphibious ships, but they also require connectors (meaning landing craft and other amphibious vehicles). The lift is the enabler that makes that happen, so we wouldn’t be able to [successfully carry out a contested amphibious assault without additional resources],” Adm. Locklear said, Stars and Stripes reported.

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Obama to Kill Tomahawk, Hellfire Missile Programs

The pace and strength of America’s national suicide gains ground. It will eventually come to a point in time where America will have to capitulate to China and Russia, both of whom are expanding their military both quantitively and qualitively, as well as advancing in military technology. These suicidal cuts are nothing less than intentional as you don’t cut the backbone of your naval defense by accident, especially when the replacement is only in the ‘experimental’ phase and won’t be ready for at least another 10 years — maybe. To make things worse, who will take a stand and stop the onslaught from within? There’s been over 200 high ranking officers purged from within the military, and in all four branches.

Cornerstone of U.S. Naval power eliminated under Obama budget

President Barack Obama is seeking to abolish two highly successful missile programs that experts say have helped the U.S. Navy maintain military superiority for the past several decades.

The Tomahawk missile program—known as “the world’s most advanced cruise missile”—is set to be cut by $128 million under Obama’s fiscal year 2015 budget proposal and completely eliminated by fiscal year 2016, according to budget documents released by the Navy.

In addition to the monetary cuts to the program, the number of actual Tomahawk missiles acquired by the United States would drop significantly—from 196 last year to just 100 in 2015. The number will then drop to zero in 2016.

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Pentagon: North Korea Poses ‘Growing’ Threat to US

 

WASHINGTON — North Korea poses a mounting threat to the United States due to its pursuit of long-range missiles and nuclear weapons, the Pentagon said Tuesday in its latest strategy document.

Describing the regime in Pyongyang as “closed and authoritarian,” the Defense Department said the US military would maintain a major presence in the region and keep up investments in missile defense. Continue reading

‘China Does Not Want the Korean Peninsula to Be Unified’

China will likely never give up being North Korea’s puppet master so long as it gives legitimacy and recognition on the world stage as a third-party negotiator or go-to for the northern Communist regime.

Of course, the North Korean leadership is worried that China will use its dominance over North Korea’s economy to involve itself in internal North Korean affairs. The execution of Jang Song Thaek may have been a result of such concerns.

At the same time, China cannot help but direct more discontent and annoyance at North Korea. North Korea is staying afloat on Chinese assistance, but the country has implemented a political stance that is causing much difficulty for the Chinese.

Moreover, China’s leaders remember little about the Korean War and have little reason to continue helping North Korea. Continue reading

Insight: Japan unease over U.S. alliance adds fuel to Abe’s security shift

In public, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s government lists a more assertive China and a volatile North Korea as its top security concerns.

Behind the scenes, though, another concern is growing: that the United States may one day be unable or unwilling to defend Japan, interviews with Abe advisers, politicians and security experts show. The worries are adding momentum to Abe’s drive to beef up Japan’s air and naval forces while loosening constitutional limits on action its military can take abroad. Continue reading

Report: U.S. intelligence ignored technology that could track nuclear proliferation by rogue states

The Defense Department has acknowledged that the intelligence community failed to develop the tools or coordination to monitor nuclear efforts in Iran and other countries with suspected weapons programs.

In a report, the Pentagon’s Defense Science Board asserted that the intelligence community, uncertain of priorities, has ignored advanced technology that could track nuclear proliferation. Continue reading