Gertz: U.S. Must Go on the ‘Offensive’ During the Information Age

 

Washington Free Beacon senior editor Bill Gertz discussed his new book, iWar: War and Peace in the Information Age, on Friday with Rush Limbaugh on his radio show.

“As somebody who knows about cyber wars and cyber security, how do you, Bill Gertz …? How do you process this stuff? How do you react to it?” Limbaugh asked. “Because you know whether some of this stuff is true, legitimate or not. So how do you deal with it yourself?”

Gertz responded by calling developments in the cyber domain an “amazing phenomenon” and discussed how cyber will dominate the current “information age” society, where people are under assault from all quarters. Continue reading

Before attacking Trump team’s Russia ties, top Democrats were currying favor in Moscow

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Sept. 8, 2012. / Mikhail Metzel / AFP / Getty

 

Democratic Party leaders who are currently blasting Moscow’s alleged meddling in the 2016 elections and condemning President-elect Donald Trump’s supposed close ties to Vladimir Putin were not too long ago seeking “deepening ties” – and sometimes huge wads of cash – from the very same Russians.

Hillary Clinton as secretary of state in 2010 “was leading the way in urging U.S.-Russia business expansion, complete with an American high-tech delegation to Moscow and U.S. investments in Russian cyberskills,” Rowan Scarborough reported for The Washington Times on Dec. 18.

Now, Clinton and the Obama administration claim Putin ordered cyberattacks against the Democratic National Committee and Russia provided embarrassing stolen emails to WikiLeaks. Continue reading

Murphy’s Law: The Empire Prepares For War Once More

Since the end of the Cold War in 1991 there has been growing pressure from many Japanese and Japanese allies for revisions of the Japanese constitution to allow weapons exports and more cooperation on military matters with allies that Japan depends on for much of its military defense. This is because of post-World War II reforms (and reaction to the military government that got the Japanese Empire into World War II, with disastrous results) that severely restricted Japanese defense policies. The post war constitution forbade Japan from possessing offensive military forces. Thus the Japanese armed forces are called the “Self Defense Forces.” It was decades before Japan could even bring itself to build major weapons for its self-defense forces. By the late 1980s Japanese companies found that they were quite good at building quality high tech weapons. At that point, an international marketing survey indicated that, if Japan were allowed to export weapons, they would eventually capture up to 45 percent of the world tank and self-propelled artillery market, 40 percent of military electronic sales, and 60 percent of warship construction. That seemed optimistic, but there was no doubt that the Japanese could produce world class weapons. Throughout the 1990s, Japanese manufacturers produced nearly $7 billion worth of weapons a military equipment a year, just for the self-defense force. Continue reading

Air Force: Hypersonic Missiles From China, Russia Pose Growing Danger to U.S.

An artistic rendering of a hypersonic aircraft / AP

 

 

U.S. falling behind in race for high-speed maneuvering weapons

The United States is vulnerable to future attack by hypersonic missiles from China and Russia and is falling behind in the technology race to develop both defensive and offensive high-speed maneuvering arms, according to a new Air Force study.

“The People’s Republic of China and the Russian Federation are already flight-testing high-speed maneuvering weapons (HSMWs) that may endanger both forward deployed U.S. forces and even the continental United States itself,” an executive summary of the report says.

“These weapons appear to operate in regimes of speed and altitude, with maneuverability that could frustrate existing missile defense constructs and weapon capabilities.” Continue reading

Sweden brings back Cold War weapons to deter Kremlin

 

Faced with a newly aggressive Russia, Sweden is taking mothballed Cold War missile launchers out of storage in museums to shore up the defenses on its Baltic Sea front line, according to The Times. Continue reading

World War 3 Update: UK Still Fearful, Plans Sending Missiles to Russian Border

Putin has already indicated that the regular launch of the missiles and drills are not because the nation has been planning to attack the NATO members or the rival countries. It was just a preparation by the Russians to ensure the nation’s security. He added that Russia’s security is much more important for them rather than attacking rival nations. Continue reading

Nato puts 300,000 troops on ‘HIGH ALERT’ amid fears of all out confrontation with Russia

NATO is said to be preparing a military force of up to 300,000 personnel, capable of being deployed within just two months, in response to growing tensions between the West and Russia.

Secretary General of Nato, Jens Stoltenberg, said the allied nations are putting hundreds of thousands of troops in a state of high alert in an effort to deter a mounting threat from Moscow.

While Nato cut its defence budget and military investment since the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia has been bolstering its military capabilities, holding parades involving more than 100,000 troops each year. Continue reading

Report: Russia Revives Soviet-Built Military Bases in Crimea

Russia is working to resurrect a number of Soviet-built military facilities in Crimea that were used during the Cold War as a defense against naval attacks, Reuters reported Tuesday.

A resident from Crimea’s southern coast who was employed at a base last year said Moscow has begun stationing soldiers in the formerly abandoned bunkers and blocking the roads that lead to the areas. Continue reading

Russia threatens Norway with nuclear war after it gives green light to US marines

A SENIOR Russian diplomat has warned Norway it is now on the Kremlin’s list of potential

Cold War tensions between Moscow and Washington erupted last week after Washington revealed plans to station the elite commandos in Norway.

Frants Klintsevitsj, a deputy chairman of Russia’s defence and security committee, gave a furious response to the deployment.

Continue reading

Russia can only survive as a global Eurasian bridge

Russian President Vladimir Putin has every reason to be proud of himself. He is a master of high geopolitical games. Moscow’s influence is more widespread than ever, possibly even greater than at the height of the Cold War, when Moscow was the capital of the Soviet Empire and vying with Washington for global dominance.

In the American presidential campaign, for the first time ever, a candidate openly quoted Putin as a model to follow, while in past decades, Russia, in its Soviet incarnation, was just the great enemy against which the United States should prepare to fight. Continue reading

Panicked Nato steps up plans to send THOUSANDS of troops to Russian border amid WW3 fears

NATO has been forced to step up its plans to deploy thousands more troops to the Russian border as Vladimir Putin increases the country’s war preparations.

The global alliance will use its meeting with European Union officials to launch an aggressive push to implement troops in Poland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.

An agreement – signed at a Nato summit in Warsaw in July – will see 3,000 to 4,000 soldiers stationed close to the Russian border in case Moscow launches all out war.

Continue reading

Get Ready to Walk Away from Incirlik

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An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 48th Fighter Wing at Royal Air Force Lakenheath, England, lands at Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, Nov. 12, 2015. (U.S. Air Force / Airman 1st Class Cory W. Bush)

 

As U.S.-Turkey relations cool, retaining access to the air base will require ending our dependence on it.

Turkey’s Incirlik airbase has supported America’s most vital strategic needs for more than a half century, first during the Cold War and more recently in the fight against terrorists. Now, as its host country becomes less stable and less friendly to the United States, the best way to ensure continued access to this large and well-located base is to prepare to do without it.

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Did the White House Declare War on Russia?

(ANTIMEDIA) This past week, America’s oldest continuously published weekly magazine, the Nation, asked the question: has the White House declared war on Russia?

As the two nuclear powers sabre-rattle over conflicts within Syria, and to some extent, over the Ukrainian crisis, asking these questions to determine who will pull the trigger first has become more paramount than it was at the peak of the Cold War.

The Nation’s contributing editor, Stephen F. Cohen, reported Vice President Joe Biden’s statement that the White House was preparing to send Vladimir Putin a “message” — most likely in the form of a cyber attack — amounted to a virtual “American declaration of war on Russia” in Russia’s eyes. Biden’s threat is reportedly in response to allegations that Russia hacked Democratic Party offices in order to disrupt the presidential election. Continue reading

Russia Is Deploying The Largest Naval Force Since The Cold War For Syria: NATO Diplomat

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Just moments ago we reported that in the latest escalation involving Syria, the Russian aircraft carrier Kuznetsov was now sailing past Norway on its way to Syria, where it is expected to arrive in just under 2 weeks.  As part of the carrier naval group, Russia also deployed an escort of seven other Russian ships, which we dubbed the “most powerful Russian naval task force to sail in northern Europe since 2014” according to Russia’s Nezavisimaya Gazeta daily reports.

It turns out it it was even bigger, because according to a NATO diplomat cited by Reuters, Russia is “deploying all of the Northern fleet and much of the Baltic fleet in the largest surface deployment since the end of the Cold War,” the diplomat said on condition of anonymity.

“This is not a friendly port call. In two weeks, we will see a crescendo of air attacks on Aleppo as part of Russia’s strategy to declare victory there,” the diplomat said. Continue reading

Russia: Ready With Forceful, Asymmetrical Measures if U.S. Adds Sanctions

Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. counterpart Barack Obama on the sidelines of the G20 Leaders Summit in Hangzhou on September 5, 2016. (Credit: Alexei Druzhinin/AFP)

 

Russia is able to take asymmetrical and forceful measures if the United States introduces tougher sanctions on Russia, Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov told lawmakers on Wednesday.

Britain and the United States said on Sunday they were considering imposing additional sanctions on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his supporters for their actions in Syria’s war. Continue reading