Experian hack exposes 15 million people’s personal information

Hack of one of the largest data brokers and credit agencies in the world affects T-Mobile USA users who applied for credit checks, company says

Experian, one of the largest credit agency data brokers in the world, has been hacked. Some 15 million people who used the company’s services, among them customers of cellular company T-Mobile who had applied for Experian credit checks, may have had their private information exposed, the company confirmed on Thursday.

Information from the hack includes names, addresses, and social security, driver’s license and passport numbers. The license and passport numbers were in an encrypted field, but Experian said that encryption may also have been compromised. Continue reading

Jeh Johnson: ‘Time Will Tell’ Whether US Comes Under Chinese Cyberattack

Addressing an audience in Washington at The Atlantic and Aspen Institute’s Washington Ideas Forum, Johnson said he recently met with senior Chinese officials to discuss pulling back cyber-intrusions and cybercrime, but “time will tell whether or not the Chinese live up to” those discussions. Continue reading

DOD’s Current InfoSec Strategy Is ‘Patch and Pray’

As said here multiple times, the “patch and pray” method is the vulnerability, not the vulnerabilities themselves. Nothing will change until the IT culture changes. Businesses and governmental agencies do not want to fork out extra money to strengthen defenses until something already happens. They’re reactive, not proactive. In the end, Americans end up paying the price for years to come.


But DARPA Director Arati Prabhakar says that her agency is working to make computing ‘mathematically, provably secure.’

The Pentagon’s emerging technology agency faces almost continuous cyber threats. And according to Director Arati Prabhakar, its strategy so far has been to “patch and pray.” Continue reading

Report: Pentagon Made Fewer than Half of Recommended Cyber Fixes Last Year

In the span of one year, the Pentagon addressed fewer than half of the recommendations to shore up cyber vulnerabilities identified by its inspector general’s office.

All told, the Defense Department addressed 93 of 229 cyber recommendations made by the IG’s office between Aug. 1 2014 and July 31, 2015, according to a summary of a new audit released by the IG’s office.  Continue reading

Hackers with Russian ties ‘tried to hack into Hillary Clinton’s email five times’

Emails released on Wednesday show hackers sent infected emails to then-secretary of state in an attempted breach

Russia-linked hackers tried to hack into Hillary Clinton’s private email at least five times, emails released on Wednesday reveal.

Mrs Clinton was US secretary of state at the time of the attempted breaches. It is unclear if she clicked on any attachment and exposed her account.

Continue reading

Pentagon Scrambling to Know What U.S. Secrets Iraq Tells Russia

Why is it a surprise for nations to break from the U.S. after it has overturned half the Middle East, abandoned its allies and embraced its enemies within the region under the Obama administration? The point is, is that it’s not a surprise. America is reaping what its first anti-American President has sowed.


Iraq’s move to share more intelligence with Russia has Pentagon and lawmakers concerned.

Pentagon officials do not know what secrets the Iraqi government may be telling Moscow, after Iraqi leaders unexpectedly entered into an intelligence-sharing agreement with Russia this weekend.

The Defense Department’s second-in-command told the Senate on Tuesday the agreement came as a surprise to military intelligence and Pentagon teams are scrambling to make sure classified intelligence from the U.S. does not make its way into the hands of Russian, Syrian or Iranian authorities. Continue reading

CIA pulled officers from Beijing after massive cybertheft of US federal personnel records

The CIA pulled a number of officers from the US Embassy in Beijing as a precautionary measure following the massive online theft of personal data of federal employees, current and former US officials said.

The move is a concrete impact of the breach, one of two major hacks into Office of Personnel Management computers that were disclosed earlier this year. Officials have privately attributed the hacks to the Chinese government.

The theft of documents has been characterised by senior US officials as political espionage intended to identify spies and people who might be recruited as spies or blackmailed to provide useful information.

Because the OPM records contained the background checks of State Department employees, officials privately said the Chinese could have compared those records with the list of embassy personnel. Anybody not on that list could be a CIA officer. Continue reading

While Iran Receives Billions From Lifted Sanctions, the U.S. Military Is Cut by Billions

The fact that there will be no U.S. aircraft carrier in the Middle East this fall is an interesting development that is worth noting. It would be the perfect time for Iran to launch an attack on Israel and for Obama to duck his obligation of protecting the tiny Jewish state. Ironically enough, the Iranian nuclear deal forces America into defending the Persian nation.



The Iranian Army (Photo: Tima/Reuters/Newscom)


There are many reasons to think that the Iran nuclear deal is an awful agreement. One of those being the $150 billion (or so) that Iran will receive as sanctions are lifted.

In 2011, President Obama signed the Budget Control Act (BCA) into law which was an attempt to rein in federal spending. While federal spending must be curtailed, unfortunately the BCA did little to control the real drivers of federal spending (the entitlement programs) and instead imposed disproportionate cuts on the national security budget. These cuts were backed by a mechanism called sequestration, which automatically cuts every budget line if spending is too high. Continue reading

Updated J-31unveiled, expected to hit global market in 5 yrs


A model of the J-31 on display at the Zhuhai Air Show, Nov. 11, 2014. (Photo/CNS)


China has unveiled an updated version of the J-31 “Gyrfalcon” fighter jet, which is expected to be marketed internationally within the next five years, reports the Beijing-based Sina Military Network. Continue reading

U.S., China Agree Not to Conduct, Support Cyber Theft

The only reason that the U.S. would make a deal with China is that China now does a better job at cyberwarfare and has the upper hand, thanks to years of Obama’s dismantling of America. What’s more, everyone knows China isn’t going to stick to the agreement and continue operations. This capitulation signals America is losing its edge.


U.S. President Barack Obama and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping have agreed that neither country’s government will conduct or “knowingly” support cyber theft of intellectual property or commercial trade secrets, an issue that has been a source of tensions.

“I indicated it [cyber theft] has to stop.” Obama said at a joint news conference after private talks with Xi at the White House Friday. “This is progress, but I have to insist that our work is not yet done.” Continue reading

Office of Personnel Mgmt: 5.6M estimated to have fingerprints stolen in breach

The Office of Personnel Management announced Wednesday that 5.6 million people are now estimated to have had their fingerprint information stolen.

That number was originally thought to be about 1.1 million, OPM said in a statement. About 21.5 million individuals had their Social Security Numbers and other sensitive information affected by the hack.

Continue reading

China’s Copycat Jet Raises Questions About F-35



Did the Chinese theft of data on the US fighter jet and other weapons shrink the Pentagon’s technical superiority?

China’s twin-engine design bears a striking resemblance to the single-jet F-35. Still, the Joint Strike Fighter is expected to fly slightly farther and carry a heavier load of weapons, according to the data, which was first reported by Jane’s.

Military experts say that while the J-31 looks like, and may even fly like, the F-35, it’s what’s under the hood and embedded in the skin that really matters. The U.S. has the better computer software, unique sensors and other hardware, stealth coating, and engines technology—all critical attributes that make fifth-generation aircraft different than the military jets of last century. Continue reading

South Korea Suffered 114,000 Cyberattacks in Five Years

For a very informative perspective on how often and to which magnitude cyberattacks are happening worldwide, and especially against the United States, see the following live map linked from another post:

America: In the Cybercrosshairs


South Korea has announced that its government institutions have suffered more than 114,000 cyber attacks since 2011.

The figures were published on Friday in a report by the country’s National Assembly’s Public Administration & Security Committee, technology news site CNET reported. The committee found that 114,035 cyber attacks, ranging from attempts to access classified information to leaking sensitive data, had been recorded between 2011 and June 2015. Less than one percent of the total attacks originated from IP addresses in North Korea. Continue reading

USAF begins removing nuclear role from some B-52 bombers

America’s continued suicidal disarmament while its enemies continue to arm and modernize:



Thirty of the USAF’s 76 operational B-52H bombers are to lose their nuclear role under the terms of the New START treaty with Russia. A further 12 monthballed aircraft will also go through the process, with work set to be complete in early 2017. Source: IHS/Patrick Allen


The US Air Force (USAF) has begun converting nearly half of its Boeing B-52H Stratofortress strategic bombers to the conventional role only, in line with the New Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (New START) signed with Russia in April 2010, the service announced on 17 September.

Conversion of the first (serial number 61-1021) of 30 operational aircraft into non-nuclear-capable platforms was completed at Barksdale Air Force Base (AFB) in Louisiana over the previous weeks. Continue reading

Bill Gertz Talks Cyberwar, S. China Sea, IS Intel Scandal on Secure Freedom Radio

When the United States goes into an economic crisis, expect China and Russia to take advantage of it and kick America while it’s down. This includes cyberattacks as mentioned or even economic warfare. In the end it will all lead to war against the United States because these are only a means to that end. Their purpose is to weaken America until it’s vulnerable enough for just that.



Washington Free Beacon Senior Editor Bill Gertz appeared on Secure Freedom Radio on Friday to discuss President Obama’s tepid response to Chinese expansion in the South China Sea, Russian cyberattacks against the United States, and an emerging scandal over the alleged politicization of intelligence about the Islamic State.

Gertz told host Michael Ledeen that President Obama has instructed the U.S. Navy not to challenge Chinese territorial claims in the South China Sea. Continue reading