God Keep America Safe

Liliya Shevstova (Source: Youtube.com)

 

Liliya Shevtsova, formerly head of the Carnegie Foundation Moscow Center and a fellow at Brookings ,is a prolific writer on Russian Politics. She was also the cofounder of the Davos World Economic Forum Global Council on Russia’s Future. In this article for the liberal Echo Moscow website, Shevtsova explores Russia’s hate-love relationship with the United States, which has remained a constant from Lenin to Putin. Russia has mastered the art of exploiting American resources without renouncing an ideology of eventually destroying its adversary.

“Imagine that the United States of America suddenly disappeared – flew to the Moon or something. What would we do in Russia? What would we talk about – who would we denigrate or secretly admire? What would the TV prattle about? And whom would Putin talk to, if the American president was unavailable? Russian foreign policy would disappear completely, since it is based on the conviction that the world held together is our enmity-cooperation with the US. Continue reading

Cold War files show CIA support for guerrilla warfare inside USSR (Part II)

Please click here for part one: Cold War files show CIA support for guerrilla warfare inside USSR (Part I)

 

Latvia Forest Brothers

 

The role of the CIA in funding and helping to organize anti-Soviet groups inside the USSR has been known for decades. But, as intelNews explained in part I of this article, a batch of recently released documents, unearthed by Russian-language service of Latvian state television, sheds light into the CIA’s early understanding of the identity, strength and operations of these groups. They also contain new information about the background and structure of underground anti-Soviet groups like the Forest Brothers in Latvia. Continue reading

Russia’s New Global Aims

The Cold War is back, but it is a different Cold War because it is a different Russia. It is important to know who the Russians are and what has shaped their worldview, including their sometimes justified suspicion and hostility toward the US.

Some features of Russian government go back to their beginnings as a country in the 10th century. Their geography places them very far north, which means that food, particularly grain harvests, are uncertain. The country has experienced more famine than feast. This is one reason for aggressively moving in on neighbors with better geography and better harvests (Ukraine and Belarus). Continue reading

Russia in 2030

It has become increasingly clear that Russia is on the inexorable path toward restoring its territory on the old map of the USSR. Whether Moscow will be able to achieve such a grandiose scheme to recreate another Soviet Union-size Rodina has been traditionally believed to depend on the strength and willingness of NATO and Europe to counter such Russian ambition. The assumption is that if the counterthrusts from the West are robust enough, Moscow will fail in its attempt, otherwise Russia’s territorial map will look like the Soviet Union in 2030.

This dichotomy of thrust and counterthrust by Russia on the one side and the West on the other is for the most part inadequate largely because there is also another crucial factor in deciding the outcome of Russia’s territorial expansion, namely, China and its own territorial ambition that goes against Russia’s objectives in much of Central and East Asia. Continue reading

New USSR: Vladimir Putin ‘to recreate HUGE SOVIET BLOCK’ in plan to DESTROY the West

Split

Putin could potentially head up a huge Soviet bloc (Getty)

 

FORMER Soviet countries could be set to form a huge powerful bloc reminiscent of the USSER [sic], the former president of the Soviet Union Mikhail Gorbachev has claimed amid heightened tensions between Russia and the West.

Mr Gorbachev, who was the eighth and final leader of the former Soviet Union, has suggested countries within the former Communist republic could form a new union with an opt-in basis.

Reflecting on the collapse of the USSR in an interview with a Russian TV show to mark the 25th anniversary of its dissolution, the former statesman said: “I think that a new union is possible.” Continue reading

The New Russian Empire

Russian President Vladimir Putin / AP

 

Russia’s annexation of Crimea in early March 2014 and subsequent confrontational policies in the Middle East and parts of Europe have spawned myriad debates assessing Vladimir Putin’s ambitions and their implications for global security. Many of these discussions conclude that Russia seeks little more than a revival of Soviet-era influence in the near abroad–that is, nations bordering Russia. Continue reading

The EU as Soviet lite: I’ve seen this movie before and it does not end well

After the Brexit and recent attacks against migrants in Britain I can’t get rid of the deja vu feeling. I’ve already watched this movie, a quarter century ago. I know how its ends.

In summer of 1989, the Lithuanian Sejm decided to withdraw from the Soviet Union and establish Lithuanian laws in the country. It was the beginning of the end for USSR — a giant corrupt monster, which for 70 years had bullied the world and its people under the pretense of communist ideology.

Intimidation and sanctions could not prevent the collapse. The fabricated artificial entity, thoroughly impregnated with falsehood and lies, fell apart like a house of cards. Continue reading

The New Middle East: Exit America Enter Russia

Is the genie finally out of the bottle?

A myriad of seemingly unrelated events and loose ends are converging in a manner that points in the direction of a huge win for Russian diplomacy in the Middle East, and we only need to connect the dots to see this scenario unfolding.

What dots, one might ask? Continue reading

The Unexpected Snake

https://i1.wp.com/www.familysecuritymatters.org/imglib/20130501_SNAKE_LARGE.jpg

Click to learn your lesson.

 

The Farmer and the Snake

A Farmer walked through his field one cold winter morning. On the ground lay a Snake, stiff and frozen with the cold. The Farmer knew how deadly the Snake could be, and yet he picked it up and put it in his bosom to warm it back to life.

The Snake soon revived, and when it had enough strength, bit the man who had been so kind to it. The bite was deadly and the Farmer felt that he must die. “Oh,” cried the Farmer with his last breath, “I am rightly served for pitying a scoundrel.”

The Greatest Kindness Will Not Bind the Ungrateful. Continue reading

Top Russian Test Pilot: Russia – Not The U.S. – Is The Only Country With Successful Fifth-Generation Aircraft

When American fifth-generation fighters, the F-35 in particular, have 419 deficiencies, the Russian test pilot might actually not be spreading propaganda.

 

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Anatoly Kvochur (Source: Migflug.com)

 

On April 11, 2016, the pro-Kremlin media outlet Pravda.ru published an interview with Anatoly Kvochur, a distinguished Russian test pilot, who started his career in the Soviet forces and is currently deputy chief of the Gromov Flight Research Institute at Zhukovsky airbase. In the interview, Kvochur states that Russia has developed successful fifth-generation fighter aircraft – as opposed to the U.S., whose F-22 and F-35 fifth-generation fighter jets should, he claims, be considered a “failure.”[1] He also asserts that Russia’s “military doctrine is purely defensive,” whereas U.S. military doctrine is “a doctrine of global domination.”

On March 2, 2016, Russian Aerospace Forces commander Viktor Bondarev announced that Russia’s sixth-generation fighter is being developed in both manned and unmanned versions.[2]

The following are excerpts from Kvochur’s interview with Pravda.ru:[3] Continue reading

In Russia, young Communists see moment to vie for power

Again giving pause to Vladimir Putin’s creation of his own private army (See also HERE, HERE and HERE)

 

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Gennady Zyuganov (c.), leader of the Russian Communist Party, takes part in a procession to celebrate the Defender of the Fatherland Day, on Feb. 23, in central Moscow. | Grigory Dukor/Reuters/File

 

Under the impact of economic crisis and impatient with ‘mutant capitalism’ dominated by Kremlin cronies, younger members of the Communist Party say they could provide an alternative to ‘Putinism.’

In defiance of all expectations when the USSR collapsed, large numbers of youthful and often well-educated new activists are moving into Russia’s old Communist Party, and starting to rejuvenate its complexion and its prospects.

And under the impact of a deepening economic crisis, and impatient with what Mr. Popov calls “mutant capitalism” dominated by Kremlin cronies, younger communists say it’s time to vie for power in Russia again. Continue reading

The Cold War Never Ended

It’s true the Cold War never ended. It’s technically the third world war and a new phase of it. It’s also one of the Origins of the Fourth World War. It’s sadly what most Americans don’t know and what most Americans don’t want to hear. Communism did not die simply because a wall was torn down in Berlin, but the visual effect psychologically convinced hundreds of millions.

The author of this article, who’s a bit late in the game, would benefit from decades of JR Nyquist analysis:

JR Nyquist Financial Sense Online archive

JR Nyquist website

 

A lot of conservatives have expressed shock and disorientation at the revival of enthusiasm for socialism, not to mention the shattering of the consensus for free trade, low taxes, open markets, freedom of expression, and so forth. It is clear—and I wrote a long memo about this at AEI about five years ago that I cannot now find—that we all made a major mistake in the early 1990s when the Cold War ended in thinking that the triumph of free markets and liberal democracy was permanent. (Anyone remember The End of History?)

Continue reading

Welcome to Europe! Soros Adding Fuel to the Fire of EU’s Refugee Crisis

For more background information on the corrupted currency wrecker, convicted felon and self-proclaimed ‘philantrophist’, please see HERE and HERE.

 

American business magnate George Soros is making every effort to boost the refugee flow to Europe, by encouraging asylum seekers to travel to the continent and urging the European leaders to fork out, F. William Engdahl notes.

“Since John D. Rockefeller was advised to protect his wealth from government taxation by creating a tax-exempt philanthropic foundation in 1913, foundations have been used by American oligarchs to disguise a world of dirty deeds under the cover ‘doing good for mankind,’ known by the moniker ‘philanthropy’ for mankind-loving,” Engdahl writes in his recent article for New Eastern Outlook.

Continue reading

Israel perturbed by the arrival of 3,000 Iranian troops in Syria with 2,000 Cubans

A small new update from a previous post on Cuban troops in Syria:

 

Israel and Iran engaged in a duel of messages on Wednesday and Thursday (October 14-15), with Russia standing behind Iran.

Fearing the IDF may strike its forces in Syria, Tehran sent Jerusalem a deterrent message: the revelation of its underground tunnel networks for launching and storing ballistic missiles.

Continue reading

Vlad and Yuri: How Putin is applying the lessons of Afghanistan to Syria

Vladimir Putin is following in the footsteps of his old KGB boss Yuri Andropov, who took the Soviet Union into Afghanistan in 1979 to shore up a failing client in Kabul. To succeed where Andropov failed, Putin will need to devote considerable resources and manpower to save Bashar al-Assad. But there are also significant differences in the challenges the two faced that favor Putin. Saudi Arabia will be his constant enemy, just as it was Andropov’s.

In the fall of 1979, Andropov was the principal advocate in the Kremlin of a Soviet military intervention in Afghanistan to keep the communist Afghan government in power. The Marxist Afghan party was rapidly losing control of the country to the mujahedeen, and KGB chief Andropov warned defeat in Afghanistan would destabilize all of Soviet Central Asia. Andropov convinced an ailing Leonid Brezhnev that it would be an easy and cheap victory. In 1956, Andropov had been the Soviet ambassador in Hungary who called for Soviet intervention there, which had kept Budapest in the Warsaw Pact. Continue reading