Kim Jong-un disappears as regime in dire straits: Duowei

The real reason North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un has disappeared for the last three weeks is more related to politics than to his ailing health, claims Duowei News, a US-based Chinese political news website.

The 31-year-old Kim has not appeared in public for more than 20 days and missed a parliamentary session for the first time since becoming North Korea’s supreme leader nearly three years ago.

While North Korea’s state media later admitted that Kim has been “suffering discomfort,” Duowei claims that the real reason Kim has not been seen since Sept. 3 is because of dire instability in his regime. Citing rumors circulating in North Korea’s political circles, Duowei suggests that Kim may have already been placed under house arrest by Hwang, who forced Kim elevate him to second-in-command as part of his plan to eventually usurp Kim’s throne. Continue reading

China May Have Undergone Some Kind of Coup

Soldiers perform military exercises on July 22, 2014, in Beijing, China. Massive military exercises extending from July to September may have been directed at keeping a lid on the domestic political situation, argues Chen Pokong. (ChinaFotoPress via Getty Images)

 

An unusual and massive military exercise has been going on in China, and it seems to have had purposes that are more political than military.

“Firepower-2014″ kicked off on July 15, and 10 consecutive live ammunition drills across military regions were launched by the Chinese People’ Liberation Army. In the meantime, the Navy and the Air Force also mobilized to participate in the exercises in the Beibu Gulf, Bohai Sea, Yellow Sea, and East China Sea.

With the participation of the three armed forces and the troops from the six military regions, the exercise was dubbed as an unprecedented “Massive Military Exercise of the Three Armed Forces in Four Seas.” Continue reading

China’s Strategy in Afghanistan

Beijing is keen to increase its involvement in the country following the planned U.S. withdrawal in 2014. But security problems may interfere.

For a relatively small drilling operation, China National Petroleum Corporation’s (CNPC) project in Afghanistan’s Sar-e-Pul province has a large footprint. Several layers of fences and containers serving as blast walls surround the extraction site, which includes dormitories, an office complex and various security structures. Throughout the day, trucks ferry in equipment and more containers. On the outside, the faces are all Afghan, but CNPC’s logo and bright red Chinese slogans are impossible to miss. Continue reading

Major Players in Beijing Power Struggle

Amidst the alleged coup that took place in China, here is a quick list of who’s who in today’s Chinese movers and shakers (click link for pictures):

Hu Jintao
Current paramount leader of Chinese Communist Party.
Promoted for persecution in Tibet.
To be replaced by Xi Jinping.
Allied with Premier Wen Jiabao.

Wen Jiabao
Premier
Argued against Bo Xilai’s promotion to vice premier during 17th Congress.
Wants to reform CCP.

Xi Jinping
Next Chairman, current VP, vice chair Central Military Commission
Unaligned, tolerated by both factions but was possible target for overthrow by Bo Xilai and Zhou Yongkang.

Wang Lijun
Former Head of Chongqing Municipal Public Security Bureau
Attempted to defect while at the U.S. Consulate Feb. 6.
Rumored to have betrayed Bo to Hu-Wen faction, possibly leading to Bo’s arrest.

Jiang Zemin
Former leader of communist party
Is said to be the real No. 2 of the Standing Committee. Helped further Bo Xilai’s political career.

Zhou Yongkang
Secretary of Political and Legislative Affairs Committee.
Rumored to have been recently purged. Hard-liner and ally of Jiang; rose through persecuting Falun Gong.

Bo Xilai
Former Chongqing party secretary
Ally of Zhou and Jiang, once a possibility for Standing Committee, recently purged and arrested. Rose through persecuting Falun Gong.

Full article: Major Players in Beijing Power Struggle (Epoch Times)