China Seeking to Succeed Where Japan Failed in Yuan Global Push

As China’s yuan takes the first steps toward becoming a global reserve currency, Japan offers a lesson on how hard it is to rival the dollar’s supremacy.

The Japanese yen’s share of global reserves reached a record 8.5 percent in 1991 as the nation’s post-War industrial boom made its economy the world’s second-largest. But its economic decline soon resulted in its clout shrinking as the euro gained ground and the greenback re-asserted its dominance. While the yen is still ranked third for trading and fourth for payments, it now accounts for just 4 percent of world reserves, compared with the dollar’s 64 percent and the yuan’s 1 percent. Continue reading

China Is Buying the Chicago Stock Exchange. A Dangerous Signal for the Global Economy

Capital flight or capitol fight: Why is so much money fleeing China, and what is the biggest ramification?

An obscure Chinese company is buying the Chicago Stock Exchange. The February 5 announcement stirred a tumult on Capitol Hill. Members of both parties of Congress denounced the takeover, calling for the Treasury Department to investigate the proposed sale.

Yet the founder of the Chongqing Casin Enterprise Group (Casin Group), which is buying the Chicago Exchange, assured regulators that his intentions were purely financial in nature. He planned on keeping the United States management team in place and said he would use information learned from the Chicago Exchange “to help develop financial markets in China over the longer term and to bring exciting Chinese growth companies to U.S. investors.”

So what’s the problem?

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China’s currency reserves plunged in January

While you were busy watching Super Bowl 50, the Chinese continued dumping U.S. Dollars in record amounts.

 

At $3.23 trillion, China still has the world’s biggest reserve of foreign currency holdings.But that has declined by $420bn over six months and stands at the lowest level since May 2012. Continue reading

James Dale Davidson: Current Global Crash Is a ‘Rerun of 1929’

Please see the website for the video.

 

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The current global stock-market crash is eerily reminiscent of the Wall Street crash of 1929, investment expert and author James Dale Davidson told Newsmax TV.

“What we’re seeing, if I could say it this way, is a rerun of 1929 with the main crash falling in Shanghai rather than in Wall Street,” he told “Newsmax Prime.”

“If you’re not scared, you’re not watching,” he said. “Since the last time I was on Newsmax TV on the 11th of August to discuss the Chinese devaluation, which was a small step, I said it was only the beginning of a major change that was going on. And since that time, $5 trillion have gone to money heaven, which is a significant change,” he said. Continue reading

Peter Schiff on U.S. Dollar Crisis: “The Dollar Bubble Is Going to Burst”

Peter Schiff, economist, best-selling author, and CEO of Euro Pacific Capital, believes a U.S. dollar crisis is underway.

“The dollar is very overvalued…and the dollar is a bubble,” he told Newsmax Prime on Aug. 11. “This dollar bubble is going to burst.”

Indeed, less than two weeks after Schiff’s interview, the U.S. dollar index, which measures the greenback against a basket of currencies, has retreated 2.1% to 93.063 for a fourth-straight loss.

And U.S. markets are getting rocked with a major sell-off – last week finished out as the worst for stocks in four years… Continue reading

Dangerous Currency War Dragging World Toward World War III

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Echoes of 1934 are thundering with increasing intensity.

In 1934, United States President Franklin Delano Roosevelt outlawed the private ownership of gold. People who refused to turn their gold over to the government went to jail. With the same presidential order Roosevelt shocked the world by devaluing the dollar. The cost for an ounce of gold, previously set at $20.67, henceforth cost $35.

President Roosevelt told the country that it was a radical effort to stimulate America’s economy. A cheaper dollar would make America’s exports less expensive and help American companies sell more products to the rest of the world, he said. More money would flow into America, and more jobs would be created.

It did those things. And it also marched the world another giant step closer to war.

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Global markets tumble as commodity prices fall into ‘death spiral’

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Britain’s benchmark index falls into correction territory as US stocks suffer biggest fall since February 2014

The FTSE 100 fell into official correction territory on Thursday, one point shy of January’s year-low hit, after an eighth consecutive day of losses.

Fraught with concerns about slowing growth in China and the after-effects of last week’s devaluation of the yuan, investors fled to the side lines, bringing this week’s losses to 2.5pc. The FTSE 100 closed 35.56 lower at 6,367.89.

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Global stocks in ‘panic mode’ as Chinese factory slump drags on markets

Global markets are hemorrhaging. How many more band-aids can be put on a wound that is somehow only delaying the death of the patient?

 

Britain’s leading share index fell to 6,286 points on Friday morning immediately after opening, a decline of 1.26%.
The drop mirrored stock markets across Asia-Pacific after they went into “panic mode” when further signs of a weakening Chinese economy compounded overnight losses on Wall Street and European bourses.

China’s factory sector shrank at its fastest pace in more than six years in August as domestic and export demand dwindled, a private survey showed, adding to worries that the world’s second-largest economy may be slowing sharply and sending financial markets into a tailspin.

China’s surprise devaluation of the yuan and heavy selling in its stock markets in recent weeks have sparked fears that it could be at risk of a hard landing, which would hammer world growth. Continue reading

China’s Economic Woes Should Set Alarm Bells Ringing

The Chinese government insists that the economy is sailing smoothly and will achieve its seven-percent growth target, but exports and domestic consumption are slowing.

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