Asia emerges as an economic zone

Source: Bloomberg

Source: Bloomberg

 

Asian currencies (Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, India, Indonesia, Taiwan and China) are now trading in lockstep with the Japanese yen. In large part this is managed: so many Asian countries compete in the same export markets that their central banks try to keep their currencies aligned with each other. Continue reading

“It Was A Deer In Headlights Moment”: Japan Dumps Most US Treasuries Since May 2013

 

With the December monthly TIC data due out this week, bond traders will be closely watching if the selling of US Treasuries by foreign accounts, and especially central banks, which as we have repeatedly shown for the past several months has hit record levels…

However, this time the surprise may not be China, but its nemesis across the East China Sea, Japan. Continue reading

‘The pound is IRRELEVANT’ German financial giant Deutsche Bank in shocking Sterling swipe

Deutsche Bank

Deutsche Bank branded the pound ‘irrelevant’ [GETTY•ALAMY]

 

Britain’s currency is permanently tarred after the UK voted to leave the European Union (EU), according to one of the bank’s foreign exchange strategists.

As a result, the pound is set to lose its prized status as a leading international safe haven currency, said Robin Winklertold. Continue reading

Bank of Japan Going Even Deeper Into Negative Rates

Former Japanese Economy Minister Heizo Takenaka said on Wednesday the Bank of Japan will lower its minus 0.1 percent interest rate further to achieve its 2 percent inflation target.

(TRUNEWS Vero Beach, FL) – Takenaka stressed that “core-core inflation”, which excludes food and energy prices, rose around 1 percent last year, reversing the 1 percent decline seen before BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda took the post early 2013.

“I think BOJ Governor Kuroda has been doing well, although there is strong criticism.” Continue reading

China Seeking to Succeed Where Japan Failed in Yuan Global Push

As China’s yuan takes the first steps toward becoming a global reserve currency, Japan offers a lesson on how hard it is to rival the dollar’s supremacy.

The Japanese yen’s share of global reserves reached a record 8.5 percent in 1991 as the nation’s post-War industrial boom made its economy the world’s second-largest. But its economic decline soon resulted in its clout shrinking as the euro gained ground and the greenback re-asserted its dominance. While the yen is still ranked third for trading and fourth for payments, it now accounts for just 4 percent of world reserves, compared with the dollar’s 64 percent and the yuan’s 1 percent. Continue reading

China’s Ambitious Plan to Make the Yuan the World’s Go-To Currency

China’s long-held desire to provide an alternative to the U.S. dollar will get a boost on October 1, when the yuan enters the International Monetary Fund’s basket of reserve currencies, placing it alongside the pound, euro, yen and dollar. The yuan’s ascent is a validation of the importance of the world’s second-biggest economy and the work policy makers have done to allow freer access to the nation’s markets.

Continue reading

Poland first in Europe to issue RMB debt in China

Poland has become the first European country to issue government debt into China’s mainland bond market, with a bond of 3 billion yuan ($452 million), marking a significant milestone for renminbi’s growing use internationally, which builds towards its reserve currency status. Continue reading

World Currency Profit Game Plan – Phase 1

Recently, I told you I was working on a special world currency report, with profit recommendations for a large basket of currencies.

The simplest way to do this is to start with the Big Five. These major currencies serve as the “drivers” for the minor ones. In my upcoming Part 2, I’ll tell you which of the minor currencies (like the Aussie dollar or the Swiss franc) are tied to which of the major ones, how that impacts their direction, and how you can profit.

Right now, we’ll start with profit recommendations for the five major currencies that drive all the rest. Continue reading

G20 Conspiracy Theory: The Secret “Shanghai Accord” to Kill the U.S. Dollar

As it goes, the alleged Shanghai Accord was a side meeting of only a handful of economic policymakers (in Shanghai – hence the name) that took place concurrently with the G20 Summit on Feb. 26.Attendees of the clandestine powwow included U.S. Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew, Christine Lagarde from the IMF, Mario Draghi from the ECB, and central bank and finance ministry counterparts from China and Japan.

The chief reason for the Shanghai Accord was to allow these choice global policymakers a chance to plan the demise of the U.S. dollar.

That’s right, Yellen and Lew are in on it. Continue reading

What Happens When the U.S. Dollar Is No Longer A Hedge Fund Hotel?

Risks for a further squeeze lower for the greenback, says Bank of America.

In the wake of last week’s dovish decision from the Federal Reserve, investors have been throwing in the towel on the U.S. dollar.

But Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s proprietary positioning data suggests there’s still another major shoe to drop for the greenback. In a note to clients, FX Strategists Myria Kyriacou and Athanasios Vamvakidis illustrate that hedge funds’ long position in the U.S. dollar remains substantial relative to the past 12 months and to other investors. Continue reading

Chinese Yuan Could Give the IMF “a Shock It Isn’t Prepared For”

 

 

On Monday, the Chinese yuan joined one of the most elite clubs on the planet: the International Monetary Fund’s Special Drawing Rights basket of reserve currencies.

CURRENCY OLD WEIGHT NEW WEIGHT
U.S. Dollar 41.90% 41.73%
Euro 37.40% 30.93%
Chinese Yuan 10.92%
Japanese Yen 9.40% 8.33%
Pound Sterling 11.30% 8.09%

*Source: IMF Continue reading

It’s Official But Don’t Assume It’s Benign

https://i0.wp.com/globaleconomicwarfare.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/y-d.jpg

 

Chinese Yuan Enters Reserve Currency Status with the IMF

If World War 3 is cyber-economic (and it is), the yesterday we just saw one of our most important weapons given away. Yesterday was a huge day for China. Christine Largade, managing Director of the International Monetary Fund announced that the Yuan has just taken its place alongside the dollar, Euro, British pound, and Japanese yen as an official reserve currency. The move has been expected for a while but was delayed in August.

Continue reading

Chinese yuan likely to be added to IMF special basket of currencies

China hopes stamp of approval will improve yuan’s desirability among investors and undermine hegemony of US dollar as global reserve currency

China’s efforts to make the yuan an international currency on a par with the US dollar is to receive a fillip with the International Monetary Fund widely expected to add it to a special basket of global currencies.

Analysts say the shareholders in the Washington-based IMF will vote on Monday to include the yuan, also known as the renminbi, as the fifth member of its special drawing rights currency basket alongside the dollar, the Japanese yen, sterling and the euro.

Continue reading

A Yuan Reserve Currency Is Coming – Brace for a $2 Trillion Global Disruption

It’s almost certain a yuan reserve currency will become reality 11 months from now, triggering a foreign currency shift of as much as $2 trillion – an existential threat to the U.S. dollar’s status as the world’s primary reserve currency.

Last week, Bloomberg reported that International Monetary Fund (IMF) officials have told Chinese officials that the yuan will join the organization’s basket of reserve currencies “soon.” Continue reading

IMF set to approve yuan joining currency basket: sources

Dethroning the U.S. Dollar, one step at a time.

 

International Monetary Fund (IMF) staff are set to give the all-clear for China’s yuan to be included in the lender’s benchmark currency basket, laying the groundwork for a favorable decision by policymakers, people familiar with the discussions said late Sunday.

The IMF’s executive board is scheduled to decide in November on putting the yuan on a par with the dollar, yen, euro and pound sterling and a key factor will be its performance against a checklist of technical criteria, as assessed by IMF staff. Continue reading