MAPPED: Catalonia is NOT alone – the regions desperate for independence threatening the EU

The regions wanting more autonomy or independence [Mauldin Economics]

 

CATALONIA’S quest for independence from Spain could spark a domino effect plunging the European Union into crisis as a map reveals the other regions across the continent desperate for autonomy.

Catalonia threw Spain into a constitutional crisis yesterday after declaring independence following a controversial referendum.

But the region is not alone in its hope for independence and the aftershocks of the Catalonia crisis could further splinter the EU with dozens of regions hoping to return to autonomy and fighting their own battle to regain control. Continue reading

FRIEDMAN: EU Officials Out Of Step With Reality, Europeans Don’t See What’s Coming at Them

Imagine the following scenario.

Texas votes to secede from the United States, sparking bitter tension between Austin and Washington. A neo-Nazi party wins seats in the California legislature.

Cook County, home to Chicago, threatens to break away from Illinois to form its own state. Worried about losing such an economically vibrant region, government officials try to prevent the election from taking place.

The federal government vows to suspend North Carolina’s voting rights in Congress simply because it didn’t approve of its behavior. It considers doing likewise for Arizona.

In such a scenario, you might conclude that something is terribly wrong with the United States.

The thing is, this is pretty much what is happening in Europe.

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Europe, China, Japan and the New World Order

KENT NISHIMURA/GETTY IMAGES, SEAN GALLUP/GETTY IMAGES, MATT CARDY/GETTY IMAGES

 

A stunning fulfillment of a specific Bible prophecy

We are witnessing a shift in the world order that happens only once in a generation. The global system of alliances is being shaken. Such turmoil usually indicates a massive shift in global power. These shifts often trigger major wars.

For most of the 19th century, Britain’s top enemy was Russia. Britain’s whole system of alliances was built to isolate and oppose Russian power. But at the turn of the century, other powers were rising, most notably Germany. This development triggered a complete shake-up. Russia veered from enemy to ally in 1907. World War i followed on the heels of this upheaval.

That shift in alliances did not cause World War i. But it was a symptom of some of the other long-term causes. Continue reading

America’s Cyber Vulnerabilities

ISTOCK.COM/MONSITJ

 

Cyber is the newest branch of warfare. Even in its baby stages, it has the potential to cripple the United States.

On the afternoon of Dec. 23, 2015, Ukrainian engineers from a Prykarpattya Oblenergo power station stared at a computer screen while the cursor progressed on its own across the monitor. The mouse on the table had not moved. But the cursor hovered over the station’s breakers, each one controlling power to thousands of Ukrainian citizens. Then, with one mouse click at a time, the hackers now in control of the power station began shutting off power to hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians.

At the same time, Kyivoblenergo employees watched as dozens of substations shut down, one by one. In their case, there was no phantom mouse. A computer on their network that they could not locate was being used by someone to shut down the power—and there was nothing they could do. Continue reading

Citizen Participation (II)

BERLIN (Own report) – The current discussion in Germany about the German population’s “resilience” to attacks by enemy combatants can be traced back to reflections expressed in World War I and during the Nazi period. In 1935, Gen. Erich Ludendorff, who had been appointed in 1916 to the Supreme Command of the German Empire’s army, declared that the “German people’s spiritual unity” was a prerequisite to victory in the coming “total war.” According to Ludendorff, the population, the military and the political leadership must be “welded” into a “powerful unity,” seeing itself as a “community of destiny” and devoting all its energy to the service of warfare. To this end, the general demanded the introduction of “general compulsory service” for men and women, as well as the launching of the appropriate propaganda campaigns – “already in peacetime.” Parallels can be found today in current German government initiatives. For example, in its “Civil Defense Concept” the German Ministry of the Interior speaks of changing the constitution to permit women to be obligated to work in “defense-relevant domains.” Through “social discourse” the population should be prepared to “assume risks” and “endure” damaging events.

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Citizen Participation (I)

BERLIN (Own report) – The Federal Academy for Security Policy (BAKS) is calling for a propaganda campaign to strengthen the German population’s resilience to attacks in their country by enemy combatants. In collaboration with “media partners” and “civil society,” an “understanding” must be achieved that “firmness against crisis” by each citizen towards “terrorist attacks” forms an “integral part” of society’s overall resilience,” explains the government’s military policy think tank. BAKS explicitly refers to the “White Paper on Security Policy and Future of the Bundeswehr,” presented by the German Defense Ministry in 2016, which is also pleading “to improve the ability of both state and society to withstand and adapt” to all kinds of attacks, necessitating a “whole-of-government approach to security.” The state-owned Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft had launched urban projects along the same lines, already years ago, in which “each individual citizen” is considered “part of a comprehensive concept of resilience to multiple security risks.”

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The Rotten Heart of the United States Navy

Caption: Donald Trump speaks aboard the World War II Battleship USS Iowa. (ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

 

The United States Navy is the most dominant military force in world history. Its firepower compared to rival fleets makes it unchallengeable. However, that power is eroding.

In response, President Donald Trump has vowed to implement the biggest shipbuilding strategy since Ronald Reagan. The president cited that the U.S. Navy is its smallest since World War I and needs rapid expansion to avoid collapse. With China, Russia and Iran challenging U.S. naval hegemony, it seems like an appropriate response. Indeed, the U.S. Navy has been losing its edge technologically and numerically since the end of the Cold War. However, that is not the most dangerous threat it faces.

The U.S. Navy has a crisis in character. If not solved, it will completely neutralize one of the greatest forces for good in the world. Continue reading

How Dangerous Ideas Crumbled France in Six Weeks

Hitler and his men walk through the capital city after the French surrender. (harWood/keystone/getty images)

 

The results of relying on the wisdom of man

The outbreak of World War i was met with cheering crowds in Paris. Frenchmen and eager youth jumped at the opportunity to join what they thought would be a short, victorious war. Propagandists sprang into action.

“I hope,” wrote France’s minister of public instruction as teachers prepared for the 1914 academic year, “that on the day schools reopen, in every town and every class, the teacher’s first words to his students will raise their hearts to the fatherland and that his first lesson will honor the sacred battle in which our armies are engaged.” Continue reading

Looking to Charlemagne

The referred to FT article can be found here:

The Holy Roman Empire can help inspire a different European Union

 

https://images.thetrumpet.com/56e32c25!h.355,id.13593,m.fit,w.640

Charlemagne’s legacy is providing inspiration for some in Europe. (Mark Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Major media outlets are starting to notice parallels between modern Europe and the Holy Roman Empire. Are these similarities to be celebrated? Check history.

“The Holy Roman Empire Can Help Inspire a Different European Union.” This was the headline of a January 20 article in the Financial Times of Britain.

Many authorities today believe returning to the ways of the Holy Roman Empire would vastly improve Europe. This reflects a dangerous ignorance of history. Continue reading

Why is August the Most Active Month for War?

 

QUESTION: Mr. Armstrong; You have stated that August is the season of war. Can you explain a bit more than just that. I am sure you have before. But I am new to the blog. Continue reading

New German Paper Signals Dramatic Military Shift

Germany officially casts off postwar military restraint and promises to help ‘in shaping the global order.’

Germany has gone through a radical transformation in how it views its military. In May 2010, German President Horst Köhler said that “a country of our size needs to be aware that … military deployment, too, is necessary if we are to protect our interests such as ensuring free-trade routes or preventing regional instabilities.” At that time, the idea that Germany would use its army to protect economic interests was so controversial that he was forced to resign.

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A New Map for the Middle East?

On May 16, 1916, representatives of Great Britain and France signed an agreement that had been negotiated by Mark Sykes and François Georges-Picot to divide up the Middle East into British and French spheres of influence after the end of the Great War and the destruction of the Ottoman Empire. The Sykes-Picot Agreement, now 100 years old, has been denounced ever since for perpetuating a supposedly artificial division of the Middle East into unpopular nation states whose existence only fuels conflicts. Many now suggest that it is time to discard Sykes-Picot in order to solve the region’s myriad problems. Continue reading

Merkel: ‘I have no plan B’ on migrant crisis strategy – Deutsche Welle

Speaking on German public television on Sunday, Chancellor Angela Merkel said the policy of open borders for migrants would remain. Merkel dismissed a “rigid limit,” saying, “There is no point in believing that I can solve the problem through the unilateral closure of borders,” according to Deutsche Welle.

“I have no plan B,” Merkel said, adding that she was convinced she was on the right track with efforts to redistribute refugees within Europe, while addressing the problems causing people to flee to the continent: “I am fighting for this approach,” Deutsche Welle wrote. Continue reading

“They want to control Poland again”

The reason The Fourth Reich category has been created is because it’s here. This article is further proof of many that the push for European dominance is not over and the continent is once again anchored to Germany.

Non-compliant member states of the EU get labeled ‘fascist’ or, as in this case, authoritarian. From there the economic penalties roll in to achieve the goal of subjugating countries. You saw it first with Cyprus, then with Greece which are now vassal states of Berlin. They are to be broken in order to reshape the continent into a synchronized United States of Europe — the hegemonic dream that never died.

The greatest heist of all time is underway and a European superpower in fact under construction.

…and yes, a European Army is coming with it.

You have not anchored Germany to Europe,… You have anchored Europe to a newly dominant, unified Germany. In the end, my friends, you’ll find it will not work.

– Margaret Thatcher

 

Only fools think that politicians in Berlin and Brussels are actually worried about the Polish Constitutional Court or national media outlets,writes Mariusz Staniszewski in Wprost. The front page of the Polish weekly newspaper compares EU leaders Guy Verhofstadt, Martin Schulz, Angela Merkel, Jean-Claude Juncker and Günther Oettinger to the Axis powers. For the columnist, EU pressure on the Polish government apparently regarding its slide towards authoritarianismis really about “the billions of euros that will now stay in Poland or continue to flow towards Germany or France.

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5 Ways Europe Is Reviving The 1930s

Unless the continent changes course, Europe is likely to transform from a harbinger of prosperity and democracy into a far less hospitable and more dangerous place.

Czech police intercepted a group of Syrian asylum-seekers on a train headed for Germany. Upon being detained, the 200 or so refugees were marked with ink numbers on their forearms. While clearly a mishap, it was not the first time that Europeans were reminded of a period many would rather forget.

In July, a Polish member of the European Parliament, Janusz Korwin-Mikke, used the Nazi salute in a parliamentary debate. Two years earlier, members of the Greek Parliament for the far-right Golden Dawn party shouted “Heil Hitler” as their colleague Panagiotis Iliopoulos was being ejected from the chamber for unparliamentary language.

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