1916: “The First Step Towards Internationalism Is to Break Down the Nation”

https://i0.wp.com/dianawest.net/Portals/0/January%202019/Screen%20Shot%202019-01-21%20at%206.52.04%20AM.pnghttps://i0.wp.com/dianawest.net/Portals/0/January%202019/Screen%20Shot%202019-01-21%20at%206.41.46%20AM.png

 

Some things never change, it’s true, especially in the affairs of nations. But if we forget, or never knew, or never understood the immutable nature of the fundamental debate over our character and destiny — of the fundamental threat to our character and destiny — we certainly are at risk of losing both.

By chance, I came across a remarkable editorial from the Chicago Tribune, back when probably it really was “the world’s greatest newspaper.” It is titled “Nationality and the Yellow Campaign” and I have posted it below. Continue reading

The Committee to Destroy The World: The Federal Reserve

https://i1.wp.com/www.goldtelegraph.com/rch-content/uploads/fed.jpg

 

The general belief among average citizens is that the purpose of central banks is to help the economy by fighting inflation and mitigating financial crisis. It’s a fairy tale that politicians like to encourage. If there were any truth to it, however, where was the Federal Reserve during the crisis of 2007? Rather than helping, it was widening the crisis with its easy money policies.

While central banks are not a government entity, their primary purpose is to create money for the benefit of the government. By mindlessly printing fiat currency, central banks create a shaky illusion of financial stability. In reality, each central bank is a monopoly that controls the production of distribution of currency and interest rates. Most importantly, it also controls gold reserves. While paper currency allegedly has the backing of the government, it is the central bank that controls the value of the currency at any specific time. Continue reading

When the US Invaded Russia

https://consortiumnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/image001.jpg

 

Amid the bi-partisan mania over the Trump-Putin Summit in Helsinki, fevered, anti-Russian rhetoric in the United States makes conceivable what until recently seemed inconcievable: that dangerous tensions between Russia and the U.S. could lead to military conflict. It has happened before.

In September 1959, during a brief thaw in the Cold War, Nikita Khrushchev made his famous visit to the United States. In Los Angeles, the Soviet leader was invited to a luncheon at Twentieth Century-Fox Studios in Hollywood and during a long and rambling exchange he had this to say:

Your armed intervention in Russia was the most unpleasant thing that ever occurred in the relations between our two countries, for we had never waged war against America until then; our troops have never set foot on American soil, while your troops have set foot on Soviet soil.

These remarks by Khrushchev were little noted in the U.S. press at the time – especially compared to his widely-reported complaint about not being allowed to visit Disneyland.  But even if Americans read about Khrushchev’s comments it is likely that few of them would have had any idea what the Soviet Premier was talking about.

Continue reading

The Deep State Closes In On The Donald: Mueller’s War, Part 2

Part 1 can be found here:

The Deep State Closes In On The Donald, Part 1

 

 

What is going on in the eastern Mediterranean and over the skies and on the ground in Syria is absolutely nuts; it’s also scary dangerous and utterly unnecessary, too.

After all, the imminent Russian/American military clash is over the skeleton of an artificial backwater nation confected in 1916 by two swells in the British and French foreign offices. At length, what was never a nation anyway has finally been reduced to rubble, misery and sectarian fragments.

So there is nothing to contest now, and, in fact, there never was. The sovereign government of Syria long ago invited the Russians in and Washington out. Period. Continue reading

Trump Now Owns the Fed

 

Donald Trump has the opportunity to appoint a higher percentage of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve system at one time than any president since Woodrow Wilson.

President Wilson signed the Federal Reserve Act during the creation of the Fed in 1913 when they had a vacant board. At that time, the law said the secretary of the Treasury and the comptroller of the currency were automatically on the Fed’s board of governors. But besides that, President Wilson selected all five of the other participating members.

Now Trump has the opportunity to fill more seats on the Fed’s Board of Governors than any president since then.

Continue reading

When College Radicals Obliterate History

This is reminiscent on the 45 stated goals of Communism, on Congressional Record, where the 30th to be implemented applies:

30. Discredit the American Founding Fathers. Present them as selfish aristocrats who had no concern for the “common man.”

Indeed it is Communism seeping into the system — since at least the 1960’s. It’s the beginning of a Communist revolution rising in America. Many see the symptoms, but not the cause.

 

Will the new semester on college campuses be as crazy as the one that just ended? It’s only January and already the president of Ithaca College has announced his resignation in the face of student protests. The largest college in Oregon, Portland Community College, has recently declared April “Whiteness History Month,” not to celebrate white people, of course, but to study whiteness as a social construct. Some have called it “white shaming.”

But of all the protests that have swept across campuses in recent months, the ones that are especially troubling are those that seek to plant a kind of ‘malware’ that distorts and even erases history. It appeared most visibly at Princeton University, with calls to remove Woodrow Wilson’s name from its School of International and Public Affairs, as well as a mural of Wilson from the campus over his “racist legacy.” No matter that Wilson was an important president in Princeton’s development, or a widely acknowledged progressive president of the United States. His legacy should no longer be remembered or celebrated at Princeton because of his efforts to re-segregate the civil service.

Continue reading