Germany Unveils “Cash Controls” Push: Ban Transactions Over €5,000, €500 Euro Note

We’ve documented the cash ban calls on a number of occasions including, most recently, those that emanated from DNB, Norway’s largest bank where executive Trond Bentestuen said that although “there is approximately 50 billion kroner in circulation, the Norges Bank can only account for 40 percent of its use.”

That, Bentestuen figures, “means that 60 percent of money usage is outside of any control.” “We believe,” he continues, “that is due to under-the-table money and laundering.”

DNB goes on to say that after identifying “many dangers and disadvantages” associated with cash, the bank has “concluded that it should be phased out.” Continue reading

Currency Collapse

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Cash is a scarce commodity in Greece.

In June, Greek banks declared a surprise limitation on how much could be withdrawn from an account. At present, the government still limits the cash withdrawals of its citizens.

Of course, this is just the most recent development in a series of events that make up the cash squeeze. In response, Greeks have done what all people do when they cannot get enough currency – improvise. Continue reading

Greece imposes capital controls, banks to remain shut

Greek banks will remain shut for an unspecified time and the country is imposing restrictions on bank withdrawals following a recommendation by the Bank of Greece, the country’s prime minister said Sunday.

Sunday’s move comes after two days of long lines forming at ATMs across the country, following Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ sudden decision to call a referendum on creditor proposals for Greek reforms in return for vital bailout funds. Continue reading

ECB raises emergency funding cap for Greek banks

Saved… for now.

 

The European Central Bank (ECB) has raised the funding cap on its Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) for Greece’s banks, according to a CNBC source.

The decision, made in a conference call Friday and first reported by Reuters, followed a meeting of the euro zone’s finance ministers on Thursday, where the ability of the country’s lenders to open up for business next week was questioned.

It comes as a specter of a run on Greek banks is looming, after yet another round of failed rescue-for-reforms talks.

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They’re Coming to Take Away Your Cash

The stories are all over the Internet. Governments are forcing us into a cashless society. Supposedly the pretext is terrorism, and the real reason is to take more control. No doubt more power appeals to politicians, and banning cash seems like the next step after mandatory reporting of cash transactions. However, I think there is a more serious driver than simple power lust.

A more compelling case is that cash banning is the logical follow up to bail-ins. Most people think a bail-in is when banks steal your deposit. So it seems to make sense that governments want to force people to keep their cash in the bank. Then they are easy meat for the next bail-in. Continue reading

What happens if Greece defaults?

The bank runs are already seen as a foregone conclusion by the Greek government — and are already happening, which is why you see a war on cash. This is also occurring not only in Greece, but other nations. If cash is irrelevant banks cannot go broke because there is no physical liability owed by these same banks.

Please see the following posts for examples in the war on cash:

The War on Cash Is Going Completely Nuts in Europe

The Secret Meeting in London to End Cash

“Cash Is Coined Freedom”: War on Cash Becomes Official in Germany, Reaches G-7, Draws Withering Fire

Abolishing Cash – New Age of Economic Totalitarianism

The New Age of Economic Totalitarianism & the London Meeting to End Currency

 

Greece is completely out of money and time is running out to save it from bankruptcy.

The cash-strapped country urgently needs an €7.2billion (£5.6billion) bailout loan to stay afloat, but so far it has been unable to reach an agreement with EU creditors over the terms attached to the cash.

Until Greek and European leaders reach a lasting solution to the crisis, Greece’s future inside the eurozone looks highly uncertain and a so-called ‘Grexit’ a strong possibility.

In the short-term Greece faces a number of debt repayments in June to the International Monetary Fund. Continue reading

Holidaymakers warned to take cash to Greece amid financial collapse fears

The Greek tourist board in London said that while it anticipated no immediate problems, visitors should avoid relying solely on credit cards or local ATMs.

Travellers should take “enough money to cover emergencies and any unexpected delays”, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office states. Travel experts recommended taking around three to five days’ worth of spending money in euros, alongside credit and debit cards.

Continue reading