Russia Unleashes Test ICBM Barrage

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(Photo Credit: Russian Defense Ministry)

 

This was the first time a four-missile salvo of the new Bulava ICBM was launched from a submarine.

The video shows the Borei-class ballistic missile submarine Yuriy Dolgorukiy diving to launch depth and its crew preparing for the launch. Then, it switches to an external view from an observer ship, and shows four Bulava ICBMs being launched in a rapid-fire salvo. Continue reading

Hunting Red October

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Satellite photo of the second Soviet Typhoon ballistic missile submarine taken in October 1982 after its launch at the Severodvinsk shipyard. The expected launch of the third Typhoon became a controversial issue within the US intelligence community in late 1983. Satellite photography was the primary method for monitory Soviet submarine construction. (credit: NRO)

 

Whenever a new Soviet ballistic missile submarine took to sea for the first time, slipping beneath the waves to begin testing its systems and training its crew, there was a good chance that an American attack submarine was lurking in the vicinity, listening in, snooping.

But before the Soviet subs left the vast construction facility at Severodvinsk on the White Sea, the Americans had to find other ways of gathering intelligence on them, and for much of the Cold War their resources were very limited. There were no spies leaving microfilm in dead drops in Moscow, no James Bond in scuba gear crawling out of the freezing water at the dock and snapping photographs before escaping in a hovercraft. For the most part, the primary method the Americans had of gaining intel on new Soviet submarines before they slid below the chilly waters of the Barents Sea were satellites that flew far overhead and took photographs. Continue reading

World’s Largest Sub Leaves Port for Arctic Wargames

A source in the Russian Northern Fleet said on Friday that the Russian Akula class nuclear ballistic missile submarine Dmitry Donskoy has left its base in the city of Severodvinsk, entering the White Sea, where it will take part in anti-submarine war games, according to the website flot.com.

The vessel, named after the Grand Duke of Moscow Dmitry Donskoy, measures 172 meters in length and has a crew of 160, making it the world’s largest submarine. Continue reading

Russian Navy’s New Sonar Can ‘Hear’ Every Sub Anywhere

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Powerful sonar capable of “hearing” fourth generation nuclear submarines lurking in the deep will undergo trials at Russia’s Northern Fleet before the end of this year.

The transmitter/receiver unit of the Batareya (Battery) sonar will be lowered to around 300 meters into the water 30 kilometers from the White Sea coast to pick up submarine sounds and send the date [sic] up via a fiber optic cable, said Sergei Tsygankov, one of the new sonar’s designers. Continue reading

Russia’s fifth Yasen-class nuclear sub to be laid down on March 19 — source

MOSCOW, February 6. /TASS/. The fifth Yasen-class multipurpose nuclear-powered submarine will be laid down at the Sevmash shipyard in Northwest Russia on March 19. It will be named Arkhangelsk, a Russian defense industry source told TASS on Friday.

Yasen is the fourth generation of multipurpose nuclear-powered submarines. They are equipped with the Oniks and Kalibr type missiles. Unlike most Soviet submarine designs, the Yasen-class boats do not make use of a double-hull-instead it has hybrid design with a lighter structure over the vessel’s pressure hull. Continue reading

Silent sub: Russian noiseless Borei class nuclear submarine immersed

While the United States continues to disarm and mothball technology, the Soviets (and Chinese) continue to modernize their forces. From the Soviet state-run Russia Today:

Super-modern, powerful and almost noiseless Russian nuclear submarine Vladimir Monomakh has been put in water to become the third ship of the Borei project. The cruiser is about to begin sea trials and mooring to become fully operational in 2013.

Vladimir Monomakh was laid down at Russia’s largest shipbuilding complex Sevmash, located on the shores of the White Sea in the town of Severodvinsk in northern Russia on March 19, 2006 – the 100th anniversary of the Russian submarine fleet.

Borei-class submarine

Length: 170 m
Beam: 13.5 m
Draught: 10 m
Test depth: 450 m
Displacement:
14,720 tons surfaced
24,000 tons submerged
Speed: 29 knots (54 km/h)
Complement: 107 (55 officers)
Armament: 16-20 × Bulava SLBMs
6 × 533 mm torpedo tubes Continue reading