Maduro admits failure: ‘No more whining . . . We need to make Venezuela’ (great again)

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During a speech in which the power went out while he was on live television, Venezuela’s socialist president admitted his economic model has “failed.”

“The production models we’ve tried so far have failed and the responsibility is ours, mine and yours,” President Nicolas Maduro told his ruling PSUV party congress on July 30. Continue reading

IMF: Venezuela’s inflation could top 1 million percent by end of 2018

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One million Venezuelan bolivar is today worth just over $8.

 

Inflation in Venezuela could top 1 million percent by the end of this year, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

Shortages in food, water, medicine and electricity, as well as high crime, plague millions of Venezuelans, said Alejandro Werner, head of the IMF’s Western Hemisphere department. Continue reading

Russian state TV tells viewers to pack essentials for WW3 bomb shelters – including iodine to protect against radiation

 

In the same report, the Kremlin-owned channel also claimed there were too many Western scare stories about a catastrophic global conflict.

A state-run Russian TV channel has advised people to pack essentials in preparation for World War Three.

The Kremlin-owned channel suggested the ideal supplies for survival and told people to pack iodine to protect the body from radiation.

The report on Rossiya-24 came amid deep tension over Syria and as a top military analyst warned that the world already has the Cuban Missile Crisis Mark Two. Continue reading

What is really scarce in a water drought

A communal tap runs as people collect water in an informal settlement near Cape Town, South Africa, Jan. 23. While the city urges people to restrict water usage, many living in poor areas already have limited access to water, and the day that the city runs out of water, ominously known as \”Day Zero,\” moves ever closer for the nearly 4 million residents. (AP Photo)

 

Earlier this year, the South African city of Cape Town was told that it would make history by April 16. On that date, dubbed Day Zero, it was expected to become the world’s first major city to run out of water because of an extended drought. More than 1 million households would face extreme rationing or no water at all as reservoirs went dry.

But then something happened. The date was pushed back to June 4. And this week, Day Zero was set for July 9. Continue reading

Worst Drought in Capetown in 112 Years – Part of the Cycle

 

QUESTION: Marty,

Any thoughts/comments regarding the impending water shortage in Capetown? As a person who has much historical knowledge, are you aware of a major city such as Capetown ever running out of water? Or is this truly a historical first? Continue reading

New Rumblings In The Horn Of Africa Over Ethiopia’s Grand Renaissance Dam

Tensions are rising between Egypt and Ethiopia over the latter’s Grand Renaissance Dam. Continue reading

Alaskans Told to Stock Up on Radiation Pills

Alaskans Told to Stock Up on Radiation Pills

Alaskans have been urged to stock up on food, water, and supplies, including potassium iodide radiation pills in the event North Korea launches a nuclear attack. (Getty)

 

In the event North Korea launches a nuclear attack against Alaska, state emergency management officials have said the federal government won’t attempt to mount any rescue efforts.

As a result, residents have been urged to stock up on potassium iodide radiation pills, food, water, and other essential supplies. Although they stress it is unlikely Alaska would be targeted, the state is home to one of the nation’s missile interceptor bases at Fort Greeley. Continue reading

How Vulnerable Is The Electrical Grid?

Power

 

When the electricity stops in modern civilization, pretty much everything else stops. Not even gasoline-powered vehicles can get far before they are obliged to seek a fill-up—which they cannot get because gas pumps rely on electricity to operate.

When I wrote “The storms are only going to get worse” three weeks ago, I thought the world would have to wait quite a while for a storm more devastating than hurricanes Harvey and Irma. But instead, Hurricane Maria followed right after them and shut down electricity on the entire island of Puerto Rico except for those buildings with on-site generators. Continue reading

Peak of Fukushima radiation now moving to West Coast — Levels much higher than predicted — Huge red blob of nuclear waste near shore — San Francisco area being hit hardest — Concern over Iodine-129 with 15 million year half-life (MAPS)

 

Feiro Marine Life Center, Apr 18, 2017 (emphasis added): Speaker Series: Studying Fukushima Radiation off the Coast of North America — The Integrated Fukushima Ocean Radionuclide Monitoring (InFORM) project is a partnership between academic, government, non-governmental organizations, and citizen scientists to monitor the arrival of Fukushima-derived contamination, cesium-134 (t1/2 = ~2 years), cesium-137 (t1/2 = ~30 years), and iodine-129 (t1/2 = 15.7 million years) in the open Pacific and Arctic Oceans and North American coastal waters. In response to public demand, monitoring began in the fall of 2014, when models predicted the arrival of radionuclide contamination from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear accident. Monitoring efforts will capture the peak of the radionuclide contamination, predicted to occur in our waters… Contamination levels continue to be below levels that are known to represent a significant threat to human or ecosystem health. Continue reading

California Farmland To Plunge “20% Or More” As Returns Sink To Lowest Level Since 1992

 

Last August we questioned whether California farmland was overvalued by $70 billion (see our aptly named post: “Is California Farmland Overvalued By $70 Billion?“).  Our reasoning was fairly simple, as we argued such a draconian outcome was the inevitable result of large institutional buyers scooping up 1,000s of acres of Cali farmland and massively overplanting almonds because, at least at the time, it was the hottest crop earning the highest returns…and that’s what NYC hot money likes.  Continue reading

Pakistan warns of “water war” with India if decades-old treaty violated

ISLAMABAD/NEW DELHI: Pakistan would treat it as “an act of war” if India revoked the Indus Water Treaty regulating river flows between the two nations, Pakistan’s top foreign official said on Tuesday.

Tension has been mounting between the nuclear-armed neighbours since at least 18 Indian soldiers in the disputed Kashmir region were killed this month in an attack that New Delhi blames on Pakistan. Continue reading

California braces for unending drought

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Houseboats at Bidwell Canyon Marina drop with the water level in Lake Oroville, California. Photo: Tribune

 

Under the Governor’s executive order on Monday, emergency drought regulations, such as bans on hosing down driveways or watering lawns within 48 hours of a rainstorm, will remain indefinitely.

Urban water suppliers will be required to report their water use to the state each month and develop plans to get through long periods of drought.

Despite winter rains that replenished reservoirs and eased dry conditions in parts of northern California, the Governor suggested the drought may never entirely end, and that the state needed to adapt to life with less water. Continue reading

China’s water hegemony

The severe drought now ravaging Southeast and South Asia has helped spotlight China’s emergence as the upstream water controller in Asia through a globally unparalleled hydro-engineering infrastructure centered on damming rivers. Indeed, Beijing itself has highlighted its water hegemony over downstream countries by releasing some dammed water for drought-hit nations in the lower Mekong River basin.

In releasing what it called “emergency water flows” to downstream states over several weeks from one of its six giant dams — located just before the Mekong flows out of Chinese territory — China brashly touted the utility of its upstream structures in fighting droughts and floods. Continue reading

TTIP and CETA Would ‘Remove People’s Rights From Basic Human Needs’

The controversial TTIP and CETA trade deals could leave people’s access to basic rights such as water and energy at the mercy of large multinational corporations as part of a wholesale takeover of public services, a new report has warned.

The ‘Public Services Under Attack’ report, released by a group of international NGOs and trade unions, claims that the CETA and TTIP trade deals, being negotiated between the EU, and Canada and the US respectively, would expose public services to highly damaging “commercialization” from multinational corporations.

While the UK government has previously stated that “TTIP will not change the way that the NHS, or other public services, is run,” the report has raised questions over the legitimacy of such claims, pointing out the ‘negative list’ approach to public services in the CETA deal. Continue reading

Lake Powell’s receding waters show risk of U.S. ‘megadrought’

More than 500 feet (150 meters) deep in places and with narrow side canyons, the shoreline of the lake is longer than the entire West Coast of the United States. It extends upstream into Utah from Arizona’s Glen Canyon Dam and provides water for Nevada, Arizona and California.

But a severe drought in recent years, combined with the tapping of the lake’s water at what many consider to be an unsustainable level, has reduced its levels to only about 42 percent of its capacity, according to the U.S. space agency NASA. Continue reading