In the Wake of the Bombs

 

BERLIN/DAMASCUS/MOSCOW(Own report) – The German government, after having applauded the bombing of Syria, is now demanding participation in the country’s reorganization, once the war has ended. Chancellor Angela Merkel announced her intentions to have a meeting with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin “in the foreseeable future,” to discuss particularly the development in Syria. The enormous costs for Syria’s reconstruction, which can hardly be covered by Russia alone, are viewed as a means of leverage on Moscow. Berlin also sees itself in a position to mediate between Russia and the USA in view of Washington’s threat to attack Russian positions in Syria. While the German government is going on the offensive to win influence, new foreign policy controversies are developing among the EU member states. In addition, questions are also being raised about the legitimacy of Saturday’s illegal air strikes: A renowned British journalist reported that doctors in Douma have doubts that chemical weapons had been used in that city on April 7. According to the OPCW, the research institute that had been bombed on Saturday had had nothing to do with poison-gas.

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The Radius of Germany’s Governance Policy

DAMASCUS/NEW YORK/BERLIN (Own report) – A German government advisor has been given a leading function in future negotiations to end the war in Syria. Volker Perthes, Director of the Chancellery-financed German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP), will head one of the “working groups” recently created by Staffan de Mistura, the UN and Arab League’s Special Envoy to Syria, to create a framework for concrete talks between Syria’s government and opposition. Perthes, one of the most experienced German experts on the Middle East, attributes to Germany and the EU “primary governance responsibility” for those regions bordering on Europe in North Africa as well as the Middle East. He is supportive of possibly sending a “peacekeeping” military mission to Syria – even with German Bundeswehr participation. The SWP, under his direction, is researching the current “fragmentation of Syria” and the “development of political options” for that devastated country. Three years ago, the institute was still engaged – under the title, “The Day After” – in planning Syria’s reorganization with the Syrian opposition, in the aftermath of what, at the time was considered the eminent overthrow of Syria’s President Assad.

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Cynical Options

Out of all this mess, nobody is certain exactly what’s going to happen next. However, one thing is certain: Damascus will fall.

Whether it’s today, tomorrow or next year, by bombs and sudden war or slow destruction, Isaiah 17:1 will absolutely be fulfilled.

 

DAMASCUS/NEW YORK/BERLIN (Own report) – In New York, Germany’s foreign minister will take part in talks this week to seek possible alignments of interests between the major powers in reference to the war in Syria. Parallel developments have made it appear advisable for western powers to accept ending – or at least freezing – the war. Russia has grown stronger and can no longer be ignored in Middle East affairs. Simultaneously, the US administration would like to proceed with its announced global political “pivot to Asia” and would like to avoid over-stretching its forces in the Middle East quagmire – as the Bush administration had done. Berlin, and the rest of the EU are currently doing everything to halt the flow of refugees. It can no longer be afforded to bleed Syria dry with this war, according to one author. A similar alignment of interests would already have been possible back in February 2012, reported the diplomat and former President of Finland, Martti Ahtisaari. At the time, according to his account, Russia had proposed to the West that the Syrian government and opposition reach an agreement, following a period of grace, President Bashar al Assad would be forced to step down. According to Ahtisaari, the West, turned down the proposition, based on the assumption of Assad’s assured overthrow and a complete takeover of Syria. Berlin also followed this line of action. The theme discussed in the current talks resemble Moscow’s proposition at that time – three and a half years and hundreds of thousands of deaths later.

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Modern Strategy Concept (II)

After the United States is done suiciding itself and falls into the hands of the Sino-Soviet axis, here’s who your next world superpower is going to be in a post-American world. The Fourth Reich has landed and its EU Army isn’t too far behind. It just needs the loss of American supremacy, which is why kicking out NATO is key.

 

BERLIN (Own report) – Experts, commissioned by the German defense ministry to formulate a new White Paper, have promoted Germany to the status of a global regulatory force. At a conference, discussing the basic military policy document currently in elaboration Volker Perthes of the government affiliated German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) also expressed this opinion. According to Perthes, Germany must see itself as a “responsible intermediate power” that “preserves and develops the global order.” Germany’s “regulatory” radius extends from its “eastern neighborhood” to Africa and the Middle East. Other SWP experts expressed similar views in a programmatic document: “Germany’s periphery” has been transformed into an “arc of crisis, extending from the Baltic to the Middle East and Maghreb.” According to the ministry of defense, the German concept of order is based on the EU’s ongoing military integration. The establishment of a “European Defense Union” remains the “ultimate goal.”

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With Submarines against Pirates

This is also another reason that the Soviets, Chinese and Germans patrol the open seas and hunt pirates that articles won’t normally mention. The primary goal is not the pirate hunting itself. Aside from “maritime trade” routes, the primary goal can also be territorial claim and control of strategic waterways once you establish a regular patrol routine. Another benefit for these countries is that it’s free training for the military and even weapons testing without having an actual war. The pirates could’ve have been hunted down in their own country or a war between nations would have happened by now should they be an actual threat.

These militarization plans are certainly not a reaction merely to considerations of how to combat more effectively piracy off the coast of Somalia, but to geostrategic considerations as well. For example, last year Volker Perthes, Director of SWP, pointed out that the “interests” behind the countries’ sending their naval vessels to the Horn of Africa are not “limited to the war on piracy.” Perthes explains that, over the past few years, the importance of the Indian Ocean, where piracy is being fought in its western sector, has enormously grown. “One third of the world’s maritime trade” crosses this route, with the trend rising rapidly. Particularly East Asian countries, especially China, are making large infrastructure investments in the bordering countries – port facilities or transportation means -, which are “also elements of the geostrategic competition.” It is, after all, “it goes without saying” that China and even India have “an interest in protecting their maritime links.” Even though the United States “will remain the strongest maritime power in the Indian Ocean, for the foreseeable future,” it will soon “no longer be the sole maritime power.” Perthes warns that “the new momentum in the greater region of the Indian Ocean” should not be neglected and one must also be involved.[6]

Full article: With Submarines against Pirates (German Foreign Policy)