Is China’s space programme a cover for anti-satellite technology? Expert claims we should be wary of ‘missiles’ being launched

On 15 October 2003 China launched their first ‘taikonaut,’ the Chinese term for an astronaut, into space on the Shenzhou 5 spacecraft

This has been followed by further space exploration achievements, including an Earth-orbiting laboratory called Tiangong-1 and a lunar rover named Jade Rabbit.

But is it all a front to build anti-satellite technology? That’s what one expert warns we should be wary of, and not just from China, but Iran and North Korea as well.

In a paper called Dangerous Space Incidents, Micah Zenko of the Council on Foreign Relations explains how satellites could be under threat from the rising space exploration capabilities of certain nations. Continue reading

China: Our Anti-satellite Weaponry Is a ‘Trump Card’ Against the U.S.

Amid reports on January 7 that Beijing is preparing to carry out another anti-satellite weapons test, state media said China has the right to conduct the test because the technology represents a “trump card” against American power.

In both 2007 and 2010, Beijing carried out anti-satellite weapons tests, and some U.S. analysts suspect that the next test will see China aiming for higher altitudes than in the previous ones—targeting an object around 12,000 miles above Earth’s surface. A report on Space.com said a test at such a level would place the constellation of America’s Global Positioning System (GPS) at risk. Continue reading