Bird Flu Is Slamming Factory Farms But Sparing Backyard Flocks. Why?

Why? Because we’re likely seeing bio-terrorism.

Terrorists who could be poisoning the food supply don’t care about the smaller targets since they will have little or no impact if 50 chickens wind up dead. They are bent on maximum damage to human health and economic destruction. Prices are skyrocketing and the food supply is facing shortage and scarcity issues.

Don’t be surpised this Thanksgiving if you find difficulty in putting a Turkey on the table.

 

The Midwest’s ongoing avian flu crisis is wreaking havoc on the region’s large-scale egg and turkey farms. Last week alone, the US Department of Agriculture confirmed that the virus had turned up in more than 20 additional facilities in the region, condemning 4 million birds to euthanasia. Altogether, the H5N2 virus—”highly pathogenic” to birds, so far non-threatening to humans—has affected 168 sites and a jaw-dropping 36 million birds, the great bulk of them in Iowa and surrounding states. It’s the largest avian flu outbreak in US history—and it has already wiped out 40 percent of the egg-laying flock h Iowa, the number-one egg-producing state in the US, according to The New York Times.

But it’s largely leaving backyard flocks unscathed. Why? Continue reading

Honeybees dying, situation ‘unheard of’

If losses continue, they could threaten the viability of the bee pollination industry, US Department of Agriculture says.

Washington: Just last year, it seemed there was something to celebrate despite planet Earth’s ongoing honeybee apocalypse: Bee colony losses were down. Not by enough, but they were down.

“It’s better news than it could have been,” said Dennis vanEngelsdorp​, a University of Maryland entomology professor who led a survey of bee populations that reported a loss of 23 per cent of bee colonies – less than 30 per cent, the average from 2005 to 2013. “It’s not good news.” Continue reading