South Korean Paper Reports China Has Deployed 150,000 Troops To North Korea Border

Things are getting very interesting in Asia, to say the least. What to make out of this event is yet to be seen, but we could guess as to what’s going on, assuming a war is about to break out:

  • Donald Trump and Xi Jinping made a deal to solve the North Korean threat once and for all.
  • China is reacting to an ultimatum by President Trump to solve the problem, or America will.
  • China is acting on its own in a race against America to take out North Korea and occupy it before an American attack is feasible.

Whether it’s teamwork or sabre rattling against the West or North Korea, we’ll find out soon. One thing is for sure, though, and that is to say China doesn’t want America to unite the peninsula. That would mean land-wise, America has more options (than South Korea, Japan, et al) to contain China.

 

While the catalyst is unclear, it appears the market dropped as headlines of further sanctions against Russia appeared and reports of China deploying 150,000 troops to its North Korea border.

According to Korean news agency Chosun, the “Chinese army has deployed about 150,000 troops to the North Korean border in two groups to prepare for unforeseen circumstances.” The reason: the prospect of “military options”, such as preemptive attacks on North Korea, like the one the United States launched on Syria. Continue reading

U.S. Carrier Strike Group Locations Map – March 17, 2017

Click to see the full-size map

 

This is the newst update of the ‘U.S. Carrier Strike Groups Locations Map’ exclusive series showing the approximate locations of U.S. Carrier Strike Groups on a weekly basis. SouthFront: Analysis & Intelligence tracks locations of U.S. aircraft carriers using the available open-source information. No classified information was used in production of the map. Continue reading

The Rotten Heart of the United States Navy

Caption: Donald Trump speaks aboard the World War II Battleship USS Iowa. (ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)

 

The United States Navy is the most dominant military force in world history. Its firepower compared to rival fleets makes it unchallengeable. However, that power is eroding.

In response, President Donald Trump has vowed to implement the biggest shipbuilding strategy since Ronald Reagan. The president cited that the U.S. Navy is its smallest since World War I and needs rapid expansion to avoid collapse. With China, Russia and Iran challenging U.S. naval hegemony, it seems like an appropriate response. Indeed, the U.S. Navy has been losing its edge technologically and numerically since the end of the Cold War. However, that is not the most dangerous threat it faces.

The U.S. Navy has a crisis in character. If not solved, it will completely neutralize one of the greatest forces for good in the world. Continue reading

Russia Bolsters Its Submarine Fleet, and Tensions With U.S. Rise

https://static01.nyt.com/newsgraphics/2016/04/18/subs22map/522d0c5e2c25d15b41cdda33716ff0b520e40d94/0418-web-SUBS22map-600.png

 

NAPLES, Italy — Russian attack submarines, the most in two decades, are prowling the coastlines of Scandinavia and Scotland, the Mediterranean Sea and the North Atlantic in what Western military officials say is a significantly increased presence aimed at contesting American and NATO undersea dominance.

Adm. Mark Ferguson, the United States Navy’s top commander in Europe, said last fall that the intensity of Russian submarine patrols had risen by almost 50 percent over the past year, citing public remarks by the Russian Navy chief, Adm. Viktor Chirkov. Analysts say that tempo has not changed since then. Continue reading

Analysis: How serious is the Edward Lin spy case?

For the first time since 1985, when the Federal Bureau of Investigation broke the John Walker spy ring, an active United States Navy officer has been charged with espionage. On Sunday, the US Navy reported the arrest Lt. Cmdr. Edward C. Lin, who faces two counts of espionage and three counts of attempted espionage, among other charges. Aside from a three-page, heavily redacted charge sheet released by the US Navy, almost nothing is known about this case. However, there are several clues that point to the seriousness of the charges against Lin, and their potential ramifications for US national security, which are likely to be extensive. Continue reading

Chinese media reports of plans to build a 110,000 ton ‘super aircraft carrier’ to rival US naval power

Concept drawings of China's

Concept drawings of China’s “second generation” aircraft carriers due to enter service from 2015. Source: Supplied

CHINA has declared it is building a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier of a size to rival the biggest in United States naval service in the first move of a major new arms race.

Chinese website qianzhan.com cites “top People’s Liberation Army” sources as saying the 110,000-ton aircraft carrier should be launched by 2020.

“By that time, China will be able to confront the most advanced US carrier-based fighter jets in high sea,” the Chinese-language article reads.

China’s first homegrown aircraft carrier will be a larger version of Liaoning. The first of two such vessels is due to hit the water in 2015.

“Despite their lack of experience, Chinese scientific research personnel have the ambition to overcome various difficulties to master lots of new technologies and techniques in building China’s own powerful aircraft carrier,” the article reads.

Full article: Chinese media reports of plans to build a 110,000 ton ‘super aircraft carrier’ to rival US naval power (news.com.au)

Russia’s Military Is Back

Earlier this year, in an address delivered on the day devoted to the “defenders of the Fatherland,” the Russian president proclaimed: “Ensuring Russia has a reliable military force is the priority of our state policy. Unfortunately, the present world is far from being peaceful and safe. Long obsolete conflicts are being joined by new, but no less difficult, ones. Instability is growing in vast regions of the world.”

This is not empty talk. The rhetoric has been matched by a concurrent allocation of resources; Russia is now engaged in its largest military buildup since the collapse of the Soviet Union more than two decades ago, with major increases in defense spending budgeted each year to 2020. Putin has pushed for this program even over the objections of some within the Kremlin who worried about costs and the possible negative impact on Russian prosperity; opposition to the expansion of military spending was one of the reasons the long-serving Finance Minister Aleksei Kudrin left the cabinet two years ago.

The rest of the world is taking notice. Continue reading

Declining Power

Admiral: U.S. submarine forces decline as forces of China, Russia, Iran advance undersea warfare capabilities

China, Russia, and Iran pose regional and strategic submarine threats and are building up undersea warfare capabilities as the Navy is cutting its submarine force by 30 percent, the admiral in charge of Pentagon submarine programs told Congress on Thursday.

Rear Adm. Richard Breckenridge, director of Navy undersea warfare programs, said the decline of U.S. submarines is placing a key U.S. military advantage at risk.

“Our adversaries are not standing still, and so even though we have an advantage and we have a lead, we can’t sit on our lead,” Breckenridge told a hearing of the House Armed Services seapower subcommittee. Continue reading

China to join Russia for largest naval drills with foreign partner

Exercises are intended to deepen co-operation between militaries, says Chinese army chief

China will join Russia later this week for its largest-ever naval drills with a foreign partner, underlining deepening ties between the former cold war rivals along with Beijing’s desire for closer links with regional militaries.

China’s defence ministry said on Tuesday that its navy would send four destroyers, two guided missile frigates and a support ship for the exercises, which start on Friday in the Sea of Japan and run until 12 July. Continue reading

PLA Navy’s three fleets meet in South China Sea for rare show of force

China’s navy has carried out a rare joint exercise, involving its three fleets, in the South China Sea as regional tensions over territorial disputes mount.

The combined drill was carried out in southern waters by warships, submarines and the naval air force from the People’s Liberation Army’s North Sea, East Sea and South Sea fleets, national broadcaster CCTV reported on Saturday. Continue reading

The future is now: Navy to deploys lasers on ships in 2014

The Pentagon has plans to deploy its first ever ship-mounted laser next year, a disruptive, cutting-edge weapon capable of obliterating small boats and unmanned aerial vehicles with a blast of infrared energy.

Navy officials announced Monday that in early 2014, a solid-state laser prototype will be mounted to the fantail of the USS Ponce and sent to the 5th fleet region in the Middle East for real-world experience. Continue reading

Did Navy Make Pearl Harbor Mistake Again?

Carriers

A photo of five U.S. nuclear aircraft carriers docked in Norfolk, Va., the world’s largest naval station, has gone viral on the Internet amid speculation the ships could be sitting ducks for a Pearl Harbor-type attack or were docked due to sequestration.

The photo first appeared in early February amid concerns that having the carriers lined up in one location breached long-standing Navy protocol. Continue reading

US aircraft carrier strikeforce readies in case of war with Iran

When the aircraft carrier USS John C Stennis returns to the placid blue waters of the Gulf with her strike force of 70 jets in the next few days, she will be ready for action off the coast of Iran.

The flagship $4.5 billion carrier, a 100,000 ton floating city with a crew of 5,000, was despatched [sic] four months earlier than planned to bolster the United States Navy’s already formidable force in the region, the Fifth Fleet. Continue reading

The War on Iran

The drive towards war advances. One might also want to heavily consider what retired US General Wesley Clark had to say in 2006 about the general scheme of things in the middle east.

To highlight his main point:

  • Seven countries in five years will be taken out to clean out Soviet client states (with Iran being the final target) before the next great super power comes along so we can bring the middle east over to our side.

Keeping this in mind, you might think twice about the origins of these so-called uprisings in the middle east toppling one government over after the next. These are far from democratic and spontaneous. It’s another chapter in the decades old US-Soviet cold war that never died.

The battlefield has been prepared and the war on Iran is on. November 12, 2011 is the day I believe this war transitioned from a covert action cyberwar (Stuxnet, Duqu trojans) to an overt action conventional war, which itself an escalation in real kinetic terms, in a final attempt to preempt a regional unconventional war featuring missile-borne weapons of mass destruction.

November 12 was the day when, as seen in the image below, two United States Navy Nimitz-class nuclear-armed super-carriers, USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) and USS George H. W. Bush (CVN 77) steamed in unprecedented fashion side-by-side into the Strait of Hormuz choke-point at the entrance to the Persian Gulf. American aircraft carriers have transited the Strait of Hormuz hundreds of times over the past 32 years, but never in such a bristling array as this. The message to Tehran and Qom was unambiguous as unambiguous gets.

Continue reading article: The War on Iran (Northeast Intelligence Network)