Folding Up Our Nuclear Umbrella

There is a growing fear that North Korea’s development and testing of nuclear weapons could trigger the use of nuclear weapons for the first time in seventy years.

But the catalyst to such a catastrophe may be not actions by North Korea but an ill-considered decision by the United States.

In frustration over the seeming intractability of the Korean nuclear “problem”, some analysts are proposing that the US cut and run and “fold up its extended nuclear umbrella” over South Korea. Continue reading

Removal of US nuclear umbrella would lead Seoul to nuclear armament: USFK

As said a few times before, should America officially abandon it, Asia would likely move under a Chinese hegemonic umbrella as going to war with China isn’t wished. Asian nations already sense the lack of will from America and realize it’s not as dependable as it should be.

 

South Korea would have to think about developing its own nuclear weapons for self-defense if the United States removes its “nuclear umbrella” protection for the Asian ally, the incoming commander of U.S. Forces Korea said Tuesday.

Gen. Vincent Brooks, nominated to succeed Gen. Curtis Scaparrotti as USFK commander, made the remark during a Senate Armed Services Committee confirmation hearing, stressing that it’s very important for the U.S. to provide a nuclear umbrella or extended deterrent to the South. Continue reading

Calls in S. Korea for nuclear weapons reflect views US security guarantees are fragile: CRS report

Renewed calls in South Korea for the redeployment of U.S. tactical nuclear weapons to the country or its own nuclear armament reflect concerns that U.S. security guarantees are “fragile,” a U.S. congressional report said.

The North’s fourth nuclear test in January and its long-range rocket launch in February have led some leading members of South Korea’s ruling party to make the case for nuclear armament, arguing that it makes no sense to rely on the U.S. “nuclear umbrella” as the North’s nuclear arsenal grows. Continue reading

America’s crucial credibility abroad declines with the loss of trust — and respect

The retrenchment of U.S. foreign policy under Barack Obama is triggering major changes in relations with formerly stout allies around the globe.

In Europe, Asia and the Middle East, trust in the Obama administration among U.S. allies is at an all-time low and reflected in numerous policy decisions, undermining one the America’s most important foreign policy assets.

For the United States, relationships with the United Kingdom, Japan and Israel have plummeted. The result is the pursuit by these nations of policies that are much less supportive than in the past of U.S. leadership and foreign policy priorities.

In the United Kingdom, David Cameron and his Conservative Party have just won re-election by a surprisingly large margin. The prime minister’s relationship with President Obama is best described as “proper” but there are no close personal ties like those that marked relationships between past U.S. presidents and UK counterparts. Continue reading

Report: Saudis might help Israel attack Iran in exchange for progress in peace process

In private talks with European sources, the Saudis have expressed their willingness to cooperate with Israel on Iran, including use of Saudi air space by the IDF for a possible air strike, according to a report by Channel 2.

Cooperation with Saudi Arabia would not come free, however. According to the report, the Saudi officials said they would need to see progress between Israelis and Palestinians before having enough legitimacy to allow Israel to use their air space. Continue reading