U.S. aircraft carrier group begins patrols in disputed S. China Sea

USS Carl Vinson transits the Philippine Sea on Feb. 14. /U.S. Navy/MC3 Kurtis A. Hatcher

 

The U.S. deployed an aircraft carrier group to the South China Sea on Feb. 18, one day after China completed naval exercises in the disputed waters.

Rear Adm. James Kilby, commander of the Vinson strike group, told Navy News Service that “the training completed over the past few weeks has really brought the team together and improved our effectiveness and readiness as a strike group. We are looking forward to demonstrating those capabilities while building upon existing strong relationships with our allies, partners and friends in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.” Continue reading

Nuclear Submarines and Hypersonic Missiles: China Is Making Game-Changing Weapons Advances

Caption: Chinese navy formation during military drills in the South China Sea on January 2, 2017. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

 

The United States military could be in “serious trouble” in a face-off against Chinese forces in the South China Sea, according to analyses published this week. China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) is making massive gains in its development of two key areas of advanced weaponry: Nuclear submarines and hypersonic missiles.

Alongside these advances, the PLA is demonstrating ever more willingness and resolve to use its military might. Analysts believe these factors could eventually tip the scales of a regional conflict in Beijing’s favor. Continue reading

Russia sends spy ship near US coast, deploys banned missiles at home, officials say

A Russian spy ship was spotted patrolling off the East Coast of the United States on Tuesday morning, the first such instance during the Trump administration — and the same day it was learned the Kremlin had secretly deployed controversial cruise missiles inside Russia, U.S. officials told Fox News.

The Russian spy ship was in international waters, 70 miles off the coast of Delaware and heading north at 10 knots, according to one official. The U.S. territory line is 12 nautical miles.

It was not immediately clear where the Russian spy ship is headed. Continue reading

More Than Half Of The US Navy’s Fighter Jets Can’t Fly: Report

Photo credit: US Navy

 

The grounded aircraft situation is largely due to the fact that, for the entirety of the Obama administration, the Democrats in the executive branch and the Republicans in Congress couldn’t agree on a budget, though we’re sort of past the point of arguing about it now:

According to the Navy, 53 per cent of all Navy aircraft can’t fly — about 1,700 combat aircraft, patrol, and transport planes and helicopters. Not all are due to budget problems — at any given time, about one-fourth to one-third of aircraft are out of service for regular maintenance. But the 53 per cent figure represents about twice the historic norm.

The strike fighter situation is even more acute and more remarkable since the aircraft are vitally important to projecting the fleet’s combat power. Sixty-two per cent of F/A-18s are out of service; 27 per cent in major depot work; and 35 per cent simply awaiting maintenance or parts, the Navy said. Continue reading

Navy’s Depleted Aircraft Will Take Years to Rebuild After Obama-Era Defense Cuts

A U.S. Navy fighter jet takes off from the deck of the U.S.S. Dwight D. Eisenhower aircraft carrier / AP

 

Nearly two-thirds of Navy strike fighters unable to fly

The Navy’s aircraft arsenal is so depleted it would take several years to rebuild the fleet even if the Trump administration allotted the funding needed to repair inoperable aircraft, according to a policy expert and former Air Force pilot.

John Venable, a senior research fellow for defense policy at the Heritage Foundation, cited a report released Monday that found two-thirds of the Navy’s strike fighter jets are unable to fly due to maintenance problems exacerbated by several years of military budget cuts. Continue reading

WARNING TO TRUMP: China to flex military muscle with FIVE HUNDRED warships

As we had learned from previous posts, the PLAN can expand its navy during war, weaponize and mobilize over 172,000 sea vessels.

You can read more about this in the following previous posts:

China using fishing fleets to expand maritime claims: US official

China Prepares Its 172,000 Civilian Ships for War

US Navy’s Challenge in South China Sea? Sheer Number of Chinese Ships

China practices Taiwan invasion with civilian ferries, bomber flights in Bashi Channel

A lot of naysayers would immediately dismiss the threat, however, 172,000 vessels loaded with anti-ship missiles, cruise missiles, ICBMs, or God forbid a nuclear weapon, would be a problem for the U.S. Navy. Shipping containers can easily disguise mobile nukes loaded on freighters. Even half or a quarter of the amount of ships loaded with weapons would keep anyone out that doesn’t want to lose an entire fleet… or more.

 

Donald Trump’s comments over the South China Sea have sparked powerful response from China [Getty]

 

HUNDREDS of warships, including aircraft carriers, nuclear submarines and a destroyer force, could soon be patrolling the Asia–Pacific as tensions between Beijing and Washington reach boiling point.

China is refusing to back down over President Donald Trump’s apparent interest in interfering with the ongoing turf war in the South China Sea.

With Xi Jinping’s nation being economically strong, it has the money and capability to massively expand its armed forces. Continue reading

Yemen shapes up for US-Iran military clash

 Please see the source for the video.

 

Eight armies are fighting for dominance in Yemen, a country of 25 million inhabitants: The Iranian-backed Houthi insurgents, together with a breakaway force, are battling the army loyal to President Abdulrabbuh Mansur Hadi, which is supported by Saudi, Egyptian and UAE military forces and their hired legion of Colombian mercenaries. Continue reading

US Carrier Strike Groups Locations Map – Febuary 3, 2017

Click to see the full-size map

 

This is the newst update of the ‘U.S. Carrier Strike Groups Locations Map’ exclusive series showing the approximate locations of U.S. Carrier Strike Groups on a weekly basis. SouthFront: Analysis & Intelligence tracks locations of U.S. aircraft carriers using the available open-source information. No classified information was used in production of the map. Continue reading

Trump White House vows to stop China taking South China Sea islands

U.S. President Donald Trump signs an executive order on U.S. withdrawal from the Trans Pacific Partnership while flanked by Vice President Mike Pence (L) and White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus (R) in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington January 23, 2017. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

 

The new U.S. administration of President Donald Trump vowed on Monday the United States would prevent China from taking over territory in international waters in the South China Sea, something Chinese state media has warned would require Washington to “wage war.”

The comments at a briefing from White House spokesman Sean Spicer signaled a sharp departure from years of cautious U.S. handling of China’s assertive pursuit of territorial claims in Asia, just days after Trump took office on Friday.

“The U.S. is going to make sure that we protect our interests there,” Spicer said when asked if Trump agreed with comments by his secretary of state nominee, Rex Tillerson. On Jan. 11, Tillerson said China should not be allowed access to islands it has built in the contested South China Sea. Continue reading

Mattis: ISIS ‘couldn’t last 2 minutes in fight with our troops’

Defense secretary nominee Gen. Jim “Mad Dog” Mattis believes ISIS is “al-Qaida on steroids” and must be defeated in head-to-head “battles of annihilation” that leave “no survivors” on the enemy side, according to a recent discussion he participated in with a conservative think tank.

Mattis made the eye-opening remarks in a little-noticed interview with Stanford University’s Hoover Institution in Palo Alto, Calif., where he is a visiting fellow. Continue reading

The Pentagon’s New Drone Swarm Heralds a Future of Autonomous War Machines

 

On Oct. 26, 2016, a pair of Hornets flying above an empty part of California opened their bellies and released a robotic swarm. With machine precision, the fast-moving unmanned flying machines took flight, then moved to a series of waypoints, meeting objectives set for the swarm by a human controller. The brief flight of 103 tiny drones heralds a new age in how, exactly, America uses robots at war.

The Pentagon’s worked with Perdix drones since 2013, with the October flight using the military’s 6th generation of the devices. F/A-18 Hornets, long-serving Navy fighters, carried the drones and released them from flare dispensers. The small drones were the subject of an episode of CBS’s 60 Minutes, and they move so fast they’re hard to film. Below, in a clip from the Department of Defense, the drones are barely visible as dark blurs beneath the fighters. Continue reading

How China wins the South China Sea war without firing a shot

China is engaged in a broad-ranging information warfare campaign as part of a covert effort to take control of the South China Sea — in the words of ancient strategist Sun Tzu, without firing a shot.

The Chinese cyber attacks have been carried out extensively on regional states along with political influence operations designed to falsely convince the international community that the waters of the sea are and have been China’s sovereign maritime territory.

James Clapper, the US director of national intelligence, told a Senate hearing last week that aggressive Chinese cyber attacks were continuing. ”China continues to succeed in conducting cyber espionage against the US government, our allies, and US companies,” he said. Continue reading

Russia Keeps Provoking NATO Planes: SecAF

A Russian Su-27 fighter flies over the Kamchatka Peninsula. In April, a Su-27 intercepted an American reconnaissance aircraft over the Baltic Sea in a series of hostile fly-bys in 2016 alone, the Air Force’s top civilian said.

 

The Russian air force has not shown any good faith toward NATO aircraft policing Baltic airspace in recent months by conducting a flurry of unsafe maneuvers and flybys, the top civilian leader of the Air Force said Monday.

Air Force Secretary Deborah Lee James said the German air force, which oversees the mission, reported “more than 30 scrambles between the end of August and the start of November this year, intercepting Russian aircraft flying near civilian air routes with their transponders turned off.Continue reading

NATO WARNING: Ships sent to HUNT DOWN Russian submarines ready to STRIKE US & French fleet

And now, for a glimpse into how insanely unprepared America and the West is for a real war against Russia. This is but one of many examples where military technology and systems are out-dated, out-matched and out-gunned, or simply non-existent.

Everyday Americans have no clue as it’s business as usual with their 9-to-5 jobs and following their favorite NFL team or the Kardashians.

 

Nato is searching for two potentially dangerous Russian submarines

 

NATO ships and aircraft are desperately hunting for two deadly Russian cruise-missile submarines amid fears the fleet was ready to strike French and US aircraft in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Fears for the safety of French carrier Charles de Gaulle and US craft USS Eisenhower have increased following reports that two Russian Oscar-II submarines are shadowing the aircraft carriers in the waters off the coast of war torn Syria.

Both carriers have been launching air strikes against the brutal Islamic State regime while a Russian flotilla of warships has been operating in the same area. Continue reading

Pentagon’s top tester: Littoral ships ‘have a near-zero chance of completing a 30-day mission’

The Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship program is behind schedule, hundreds of millions over budget, and incapable of conducting most of the basic missions it was intended to carry out. Senators on Thursday said they wanted to know why.

“Like so many major programs that preceded it, LCS’s failure followed predictably from an inability to define and stabilize requirements, unrealistic initial cost estimates, and unreliable assessments of technical and integration risk, made worse by repeatedly buying ships and mission packages before proving they are effective and can be operated together,” said Senate Armed Services Chairman John McCain, R-Ariz., told Pentagon witnesses during a hearing.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., was more blunt. “The process is completely broken. If you want this to stop, somebody needs to get fired.” Continue reading