Erdogan Rejects NATO Apology: “There Can Be No Alliance Like That”

Turkey’s megalomaniac is out shopping for excuses to turn on NATO and join the China-Russia axis… which eventually will happen.

 

 

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is refusing to let NATO off the hook for an inadvertent yet insulting gesture that prompted him to remove 40 Turkish troops from a joint military exercise in Norway.

Russia Today reports that Erdogan has rebuffed a NATO apology for what he called “impudence” after his name was included on an “enemies chart” shared with military officials participating in the exercises. Erdogan’s name was reportedly included alongside a photo of Turkish founding father Mustafa Kemal Ataturk. Continue reading

Report Says Dissident Under Cyber, Information Attack from China

Guo Wengui / Ellen Dubin Photography

 

Commission calls disinformation campaign ‘unprecedented’

China is engaged in an unprecedented campaign of cyber attacks and information operations aimed at discrediting Beijing critic Guo Wengui, according to a congressional report.

The campaign was outlined in the annual report of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review commission, made public on Wednesday. Continue reading

Turkey’s Nuclear Ambitions

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (then Prime Minister) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin on July 18, 2012. Their meeting focused on nuclear cooperation, among other things. (Image source: kremlin.ru)

 

  • Russia’s ROSATOM already has nuclear cooperation deals with Iran, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, among others. Turkey is just the latest to benefit — possibly along with Iran and North Korea, both of which have been openly threatening to destroy America — from Moscow’s play for power in the Middle East and the Mediterranean.
  • The West would also do well not to feel secure in the knowledge that Turkey is a party to the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).
  • Nuclear reactors in the hands of a repressive Islamist authoritarian such as Erdogan could be turned into weapons factories with little effort.

Turkey’s announcement over the summer that it had signed a deal with Russia’s State Atomic Energy Corporation (ROSATOM) — of Hillary Clinton’s Uranium One stardom — to begin building three nuclear power plants in the near future is cause for concern. The $20 billion deal, which has been in the works since 2010, involves the construction in Mersin of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant — Turkey’s first-ever such plant— will be operational in 2023. Continue reading

The Home Game Has Arrived: Lessons from the 10th Asymmetric Threat Symposium

 

Last week I was privileged to attend the 10th Asymmetric Threat Symposium. It’s not the first of these I’ve attended but was clearly the best. Maybe the participants felt less restrained by politics and thus spoke more directly to the issues we truly face. Or maybe the quality of experts is rising. For whatever reason, the event was candid and sobering, even for me. The event was held near our nation’s capitol and was sponsored by CACI International, the Center for Security Policy, and ISW (Institute for the Study of War). The title:  What Does It Take to Protect America? Combatting Global Asymmetric Threats.

While the rules of the event require that comments be shared without attribution, I’m pleased to offer a recap for our readers. You can read the agenda and see information about prior versions at www.asymmetricthreat.netThe speakers and panelists were impressive. In fact, I counted 36 stars on the shoulders (Admirals and Generals) of about a dozen participants, both active and retired, not to mention academic and civilian experts.

There were many important points covered and I’ll recap just a few:

First, the question was asked and answered. Are we already at war? Continue reading

China Imports Russian S-400 Missiles

The S-400 in a picture from Wikipedia

 

The deal was originally made in July 2014, and Russia said in July last year that it would deliver them to China before 2018.

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NATO May Retaliate if Turkey Buys Russian Missiles

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s decision to purchase a Russian surface-to-air missile system could create major problems for NATO, of which his country is a member.

 

Turkey has already agreed to purchase the S-400 surface-to-air missile system, but has not yet signed the contract with the Russian government to complete the transaction, however the head of NATO’s Military Committee is warning of “necessary consequences” if it follows through. Continue reading

Former Qatari PM: Four foreign governments, including US, orchestrated Syrian war

An interview going viral across Arabic social media quotes former Qatari Prime Minister Hamad bin Jassim bin Jaber al-Thani as claiming that his country, along with Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States, began shipping weapons to “jihadists” from the very moment that the Syrian civil war erupted in 2011. Continue reading

Turkey to Establish 8 Military Bases in Syria’s Idlib Province

FILE IMAGE: aa.com.tr

 

The Turkish Armed Forces (TAF) are going to establish 8 military bases in Syria’s Idlib province, according to the conservative Turkish daily newspaper Yeni Şafak.

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Europe’s Push Toward a Unified Military

The official flag of Eurocorps military contingent (FREDERICK FLORIN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

 

As global threats increase, many nations support the idea of an independent and united European military. Here is why we expect it to happen, and where we expect it to lead.

The 100 years between 1815 and when World War i started in 1914 were one of Europe’s greatest periods of peace ever. But that isn’t to say it was peaceful.

Consider what happened during those years: France invaded Spain; Russia fought Turkey; various German states fought with Denmark, Austria and France; Britain and Turkey fought Russia; and Greece fought Turkey. Those are just the “highlights”—and they don’t include the numerous internal conflicts, uprisings, declarations of independence and other political unrest that occurred. Even Switzerland had a civil war.

That is what “peace” in Europe looked like before the latter half of the 20th century.

The states of Europe spent 75 percent of the 17th century at war with each other, 50 percent of the 18th century, and 25 percent of the 19th. The periods of war became shorter—but more than made up for it with devastatingly more effective weapons.

This is why many are skeptical of the creation of a “European army.” How can a continent with such a long history of war and division form a united military force? Continue reading

Donald Trump’s message to Greece: USA will INVEST in debt-ridden nation to save it from EU

A few points:

  • Trump is potentially building a deterrent against Turkish aggression.
  • Trump is hedging against the EU superstate that’s increasingly becoming anti-American through the Berlin-Paris-Brussels axis that has subjugated and destroyed Greece.
  • Trump is possibly racing against China’s infrastructure investments and Port of Pirus takeover, keeping them from gaining a foothold in one of Europe’s most important strategic gateways.

 

Trump

Donald Trump and Alexis Tsipras shake hands outside the White House

 

DONALD Trump praised Greece’s economic recovery and vowed to invest in the debt-ridden nation as he met the country’s prime minister who once called the businessman “evil” before the US election.

The US President pledged to help the Mediterreanean nation back to prosperity after its struggles with EU austerity over the last 8 years.

The two leaders met at the White House for cordial talks and among the topics for discussion were investments in Greek oil resources and Greece-based military bases as the relationship between the USA and Turkey becomes tense. Continue reading

Now Erdogan Says Turkey Doesn’t Need U.S.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told a group of regional governors that Turkey no longer needs the U.S. as diplomatic tensions with the NATO ally grow more intense.

 

The divorce is nearly over—Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Thursday his country no longer needs the U.S. Continue reading

Erdogan: Turkey considers S-500 systems

 

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said talks have been held with Russia on the S-500 system. Continue reading

The Turkish-US visa spat was triggered by Kurdish dispute, Ankara’s flight from NATO to the Russian-Iranian fold

 

As of Monday, Oct. 9, US missions in Turkey have suspended non-immigrant visa services and closed their doors to the public, while Turkish consulates in the United States have suspended “all visa services” to Americans. The Turkish currency immediately plummeted on world markets. The ostensible cause of the visa spat was the arrest in Turkey of a local US consulate employee on suspicion of links to Fethullah Gulen, the Turkish cleric living in exile in America, whom President Tayyip Erdogan accuses of orchestrating the failed coup against him in 2016. Washington says the charge is baseless and damaging bilateral relations. Continue reading

Is This The Geopolitical Shift Of The Century?

 

The geopolitical reality in the Middle East is changing dramatically.

The impact of the Arab Spring, the retraction of the U.S. military, and diminishing economic influence on the Arab world—as displayed during the Obama Administration—are facts.

The emergence of a Russian-Iranian-Turkish triangle is the new reality. The Western hegemony in the MENA region has ended, and not in a shy way, but with a long list of military conflicts and destabilization.

The first visit of a Saudi king to Russia shows the growing power of Russia in the Middle East. It also shows that not only Arab countries such as Saudi Arabia and the UAE, but also Egypt and Libya, are more likely to consider Moscow as a strategic ally. 

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Russia’s on the Way Back

Yellen and Nabiullina

 

Russia is poised to break out of its oil-related slump and become one of the best performing emerging markets economies in the years ahead. This sleeping giant is breaking its dependence on oil prices and embraces diversified growth.

When you hear the name “Russia” you probably run for cover. Russia has been the subject of nearly continuous media coverage bordering on frenzy since the election of Donald Trump last November. Continue reading