Iran reportedly tests supercavitating torpedo

The Hoot was displayed for the first time in October 2015. (Mehr News Agency)

 

Iran test fired its Hoot high-speed torpedo near the Strait of Hormuz on 7 May, NBC News reported three senior US defence officials as saying on the following day.

The sources said the Hoot is still in its testing phase and could not say whether the test was successful. They said the weapon should be able to travel 12,000 yards (11 km) at 200 kt (370 km/h). There was no information on the launch platform used for the test. Continue reading

Shanghai to San Francisco in 100 minutes by Chinese supersonic submarine

With military application of this technology today, the world’s most powerful navies could be rendered useless. As so little is known about what the PLA, one of the most secretive militaries, they also might not be far off from even having one with military application. Some nations also fake test failures in order to lull their adversaries into a false sense of security.

 

 

China has moved a step closer to creating a supersonic submarine that could travel from Shanghai to San Francisco in less than two hours.

New technology developed by a team of scientists at Harbin Institute of Technology’s Complex Flow and Heat Transfer Lab has made it easier for a submarine, or torpedo, to travel at extremely high speeds underwater.

Li Fengchen, professor of fluid machinery and engineering, said the team’s innovative approach meant they could now create the complicated air “bubble” required for rapid underwater travel. “We are very excited by its potential,” he said.

Water produces more friction, or drag, on an object than air, which means conventional submarines cannot travel as fast as an aircraft.

However, during the cold war, the Soviet military developed a technology called supercavitation, which involves enveloping a submerged vessel inside an air bubble to avoid problems caused by water drag. Continue reading