U.S.: Russia Repeatedly Cheating on Nuclear Missile Treaty

“Treaties are like pie crusts, they are made to be broken” – Vladimir Lenin.

The stakes are high America’s nuclear arsenal is facing suicidal reductions while what’s to remain is already decades old. Lets also not forget the personnel in charge of the nuclear deterrent are facing burnout and removal for petty scandals, let alone witnessing unprecedented incidents where, for example, 50 missile silos go offline unexpectedly. Meanwhile, China and Russia are both modernizing their nuclear forces and will eventually attain first-strike capability. Don’t expect anything meaningful in terms of results to come out of the political ‘outrage’ that the government expresses whenever a new security threat is revealed, as past actions have time and time again been almost nothing in response — all bark and no bite.

The consequences for turning a blind eye will be irreversible and deadly. In 2013, America is still buying New Lies for Old.

For just a few additional examples of many, click the following links:

Senior Obama administration officials informed congressional lawmakers in a closed-door 2012 briefing that Russia was not abiding by a bilateral arms control accord that bans the fielding of intermediate-range missiles, the Daily Beast reported on Tuesday.

The 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty required both Russia and the United States to eliminate all of their nuclear and non-nuclear ballistic and cruise missiles with maximum flight distances between roughly 300 miles and 3,400 miles. Russia’s testing of the SS-25 mobile intercontinental ballistic missile and of the new-model RS-26, optimized for penetrating missile defenses, may have raised the concerns about violating the accord’s range restrictions, according to the website. However, the alleged focus of the cheating remains secret. Continue reading

The Nation’s ICBM Force: Increasingly Creaky Broken Missiles

As the Air Force begins to dust off plans for the Minuteman III ICBM replacement, a stark choice faces the service.

On one hand, the time has come to replace them. On the other, the Air Force is strapped for cash, victim to a perfect storm of bureaucratic bloat, several rounds of defense cuts, and a fighter fleet exhausted by war and age. Continue reading