Martin Armstrong: Global unrest until 2032

(TRUNEWS) Renegade economist Martin Armstrong says America — and the rest of the world — will experience 16 years of civil unrest, not fading until 2032.

Armstrong’s statements were made during an exclusive interview with Rick Wiles of TRUNEWS  on Monday, while sharing his analysis of the war, civil unrest, and business cycles; and the future they predict for the United States.

In addition to four election cycles of civil unrest and social upheaval, Armstrong said economic power will have also shifted from the US to Asia by 2032, seeing an initial shockwave as early as 2018 — and going into full swing by 2020.

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Former CIA Agent Warns the World is at its most Dangerous Point in History

A former CIA agent and top U.S. defence expert has warned that the world is more dangerous than it has ever been due to the rise of heavily armed and well funded terrorist groups.

Although the 21st century has not yet been subjected to the mass carnage and industrial scale slaughter caused by the global conflicts between superpowers in the 20th century, the increased threat of worldwide terrorism ensures that no nation can consider itself truly safe.

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Cold War Resurgent: US Nukes Could Soon Return to Europe

Germany isn’t blind, but is behaving blind by willingly looking the other way. If it ever had to choose sides, it would likely do so in Russia’s favor. The anti-American sentiment across Europe rising plus NATOs current inability to handle war with Russia, as well as recognizing the need to be able to protect themselves, is why you see the foundations for an EU Army being built. America isn’t even prepared and has no defense whatsoever against a Russian nuclear attack.

 

Washington is once again talking about stationing nuclear warheads in Europe. Russia, too, is turning up the rhetoric. Europeans are concerned about becoming caught in the middle of a new Cold War.

Berlin is concerned that Europe could once again become the setting of a new East-West confrontation — and that Germany might once again become a deployment zone. A source in the Defense Ministry suggested that “more (military) equipment may once again be stockpiled in Germany.” Washington plans to station tanks, weapons and heavy equipment for 5,000 soldiers in Germany and the eastern NATO countries. US President Barack Obama hopes that doing so will soothe the fears of the Baltic States and countries in Eastern Europe, which, since the Ukraine crisis, are once again fearful of Russian aggression. He also hopes to quiet his critics in US Congress.

For German Chancellor Angela Merkel, this prospect is not a pleasant one. She shies away from publicly criticizing her American allies, but Merkel is loathe to do anything that might heat up the conflict with Moscow. Furthermore, a new debate on rearmament would hardly be winnable on a domestic front. The chancellor would potentially look like a puppet of the United States, one who not only allows herself to be spied on, but who also stands by as her carefully established link to Putin is damaged. Continue reading

The US Army Is Serious About Developing Invisibility Cloaks

If the U.S. Army is happy with a soldier donning a garment that makes her look like a shadow among other shadows, it might have an ‘invisibility cloak’ in less than two years.

Among the superpowers people want, a Harry Potter-style invisibility cloak generally comes pretty high on the list. Now even the US Army wants one for its soldiers. They are looking for companies to make them such cloaks in the next 18 months. Continue reading

5 New Countries That Might Exist By 2025

With violence in Xinjiang continuing and tensions in Chechnya and Dagestan back in the public consciousness, it seems almost cliché to say the end of the sprawling, imperial nation-state is here, or at least not far off. Hell, a couple thousand signatures for an independent Texas got the foreign press questioning if even the U.S. wasn’t immune from secessionist conflict.

Now, have the massive, multi-ethnic superpowers of the modern world really reached their breaking point? The answer’s a big, emphatic no. While there’s certainly no shortage of secessionist claims in Russia, China, and the surrounding geopolitical region they dabble in, it’s unlikely we’ll see any new (internationally recognized) countries emerge from the Caucuses or Central Asia. A major precedent — any one secessionist success story — could set off new fervor in any number of independence-minded areas that could radically undermine the neighborhood superpowers’ international standing. For the leaders of Russia and China, maintaining their borders against secessionist challenges is an essential part of maintaining their political legitimacy. Sorry, Tibet. Continue reading

Britain’s struggles in nuclear race

The Trident report that is about to be unveiled is just the latest twist in what has been a long saga of Britain’s efforts to become and remain a member of the exclusive nuclear weapons club.

For much of the Cold War, the aim of successive British governments was to have a capability that mirrored in quality, if not in size, the arsenals of the superpowers.

The first stumbling block was the shock US decision to halt nuclear co-operation with Britain at the end of World War II. From being partners in the fabled Manhattan Project, Britain was left initially largely to its own (nuclear) devices. Continue reading