Stanislav Lunev: The Russian Invasion of America (Recorded Spring 2002)

This recording is a must-listen for anyone with the slightest concern for the current state of America. The timeline may have changed, but not the plans.

Note: Please see the source for the audio recording or, alternatively, Download this classic edtion of TruNews with Rick Wiles by Clicking Here.

 

On today’s classic of edition of TruNews, Rick Wiles shares a speech given by his favorite Russian spy, former Soviet Colonel Stanislav Lunev. Speaking at an event hosted in Texas in early 2002, the former senior GRU agent detailed the extensive Cold War plans for the invasion of America, including secret suitcase nukes and weaponized Islam. Continue reading

Russia ends US nuclear security alliance

The infamous Russian ‘nukes on the loose’ is in play, once again, giving them plausible deniability in advance. Russia is purposely turning a blind eye knowing that material in the past has been stolen and smuggled out. However, what’s more important to understand is the threat (Russia) behind the threat (islam that it radicalized to use as a proxy against the West). For more information on Russia and its Russian trained islamic terrorist proxies, terrorist dirty nukes in the U.S., see HERE.

This is but one of many sources that document the situation well. Reading JR Nyquist columns and especially his archives would be a great place to familiarize yourself with it.

Still don’t think it can’t happen or the Russians didn’t previously have one in America? In an interview with Time Magazine, JFK had something to say about one in the nation’s capital:

“We have a bustling communist enclave just four blocks from the White House,” I noted, meaning the Soviet embassy. Kennedy paused, fork between plate and mouth, and said, “You know, they have an atom bomb on the third floor of the embassy.” … “If things get too bad and war is inevitable,” he said, “they will set it off and that’s the end of the White House and the rest of the city.”

Yes, the threat is real. If it could’ve happened then, it could happen now — especially with the U.S. borders being so open for years on end.

 

WASHINGTON — The private diplomatic meetings took place over two days in mid-December in a hotel overlooking Moscow’s Red Square.

But unlike in previous such gatherings, the sense of camaraderie, even brotherhood, was overshadowed by an uncomfortable chill, according to participants.

In the previously undisclosed discussions, the Russians informed the Americans that they were refusing any more US help protecting their largest stockpiles of weapons-grade uranium and plutonium from being stolen or sold on the black market. The declaration effectively ended one of the most successful areas of cooperation between the former Cold War adversaries.

“I think it greatly increases the risk of catastrophic terrorism,” said Sam Nunn, the former Democratic senator from Georgia and an architect of the “cooperative threat reduction” programs of the 1990s. Continue reading