Why is America still stuck with token missile defense?

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The covers of silos housing ground-based interceptor missiles at the Fort Greely missile defense complex in Fort Greely, Alaska, on April 26, 2018. Photo: Reuters/Mark Meyer

 

The answer harks back to a 1972 treaty, and despite that agreement expiring years ago, defense experts and politicians failed to move with the times

The short answer: the anti-defense mentality of late 1960s politicians and academics, embodied in the spirit and main provisions of the 1972 US-Soviet anti-ballistic defense missile treaty, remains embedded in the US bureaucracy, our military and defense industry.

That spirit is the heart of official US policy: we must do nothing, develop or research anything, that poses obstacles to missiles from Russia or China striking America. Continue reading

Electromagnetic attack could claim 9 of 10 American lives

All one has to do is take out a mere nine substations and it’s lights out for America. As said in another article from 2012 in synch with today’s, up to 90% would perish as a result.

The culture of complacently sitting around and “hoping” things will magically fix themselves has taken the place of meaningful action — and, evidently, it takes possibility of hundreds of millions of Americans to perish in order to learn a lesson.

This makes America all the more ripe for picking by the Chinese, Russians and even the Iranians but isn’t prepared. It also seemingly doesn’t care.

 

An electromagnetic pulse attack can take down the nation’s electric power grid, plunge the country into darkness and claim 9 out of 10 American lives within a year.

That’s not a prediction coming from doomsdayers or a sci-fi film. It’s from Peter Vincent Pry, executive director of the EMP Task Force on National and Homeland Security, who served on several congressional commissions and on the staff of the House Armed Services Committee, and was a CIA intelligence officer from 1985-1995.

An EMP, in short, is a burst of energy that can fry electronics, including computers. If the burst is powerful enough, like a small nuclear weapon exploded above the U.S., it could potentially shut down the nation’s power grid for months, even years.

Within a year after such an attack, 9 out of 10 Americans would die from disease, starvation and civil unrest, Pry said. There would be no food, no clean water, no transportation to bring food in, no cell phones, no computers, no medicine. Continue reading