Soviet Spy’s Dire Warnings 30 Years Ago Come True in Obama’s America

America is already at the point of no return. It has passed the demoralization stage and nearing the end of the destabilization phase. The next two stages to come are crisis and normalization. After the engineered crisis is quelled with the pre-planned remedy, the permanent takeover is complete and returned to normalization by the fifth column captors. America is already at the boiling point and only the hand of God himself can keep the nation from going into crisis. The protective hand of God also requires repentance from the nation, something that doesn’t seem very likely. Only one catalyst is needed to bring the nation from boiling point to overflow and scarring.

Previous posts in relation to Yuri Bezmenov can be found HERE and HERE.

A full version of this video interview can be found HERE.

 

 

In a 1985 interview, former Soviet KGB agent Yuri Bezmenov described the techniques of ideological subversion (short video below and full text), that were used to undermine American values, traditions and institutions to the extent that the people will be unable or unwilling to resist takeover by the totalitarian ideology of communism; methods adopted and now being employed against the United States by the supporters of radical Islam. Continue reading

Barack Obama admits Iran nuclear deal will mean more money for terror groups

Barack Obama admitted yesterday that the Iran nuclear deal is likely to provide more funding for terror groups like Hezbollah but insisted the agreement was still the best way to keep America out of another war in the Middle East.

In a provocative defence of the nuclear pact, Mr Obama said his critics were the same people who launched a failed war in Iraq and warned that Republican plans to tear up the agreement would leave America diplomatically isolated and economically weakened.

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KGB spies who ‘tried to recruit’ David Cameron were just a ‘gay pick-up’

It’s interesting, to say the least, that the KGB knew nothing about Cameron then, but somehow still knew about the situation and motive.

 

Moscow’s secret services say a 19-year-old David Cameron was not targeted by spy recruits… they were gay men trying to pick him up

KGB agents tried to recruit a 19-year-old David Cameron as a Cold War spy during his gap year travels in the Soviet Union.

Or so the story goes when told by the Prime Minister.

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What Happens After a Superpower Dies?

A necessary repeat, and from 2014:

 

 

What happens when a superpower dies? What happens when the geopolitical order that has stabilized the world for several decades crumbles?

We are all about to learn firsthand. Continue reading

Like Iran, pacts with USSR ignored foe’s behavior

Complaints nuke deal must demand Tehran change conduct ignore long history of arms control accords with Cold War enemy

WASHINGTON (AP) — Critics of the Iran nuclear deal claim it is flawed, among many reasons, because it does not demand that Tehran also change its behavior at home and abroad. That complaint ignores the United States’ long history of striking arms control agreements with the Soviet Union, a far more dangerous enemy.

Dating as far back as the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963 — less than a year after the Cuban missile crisis — US administrations engaged the Soviet Union in agreements to limit nuclear threats while not linking deals to abhorrent Soviet human rights abuses and the active arming and funding of leftist, anti-American revolutionary movements around the world. Continue reading

America’s day of reckoning just 60 days away?

Ancient biblical cycle now 2 months from climax

This period of early autumn was the most crucial time on the biblical calendar for the ancient Israelites, with the end of the seven-year cycle described in Deuteronomy as the Shemitah or Sabbath year. All farmland was to be left in a state of rest and the people were to focus on God and His will for their nation and their lives.

This year on Sept. 13, the Shemitah reaches its peak on the last day on the Hebrew calendar, Elul 29, known as the “day of nullification.” All debt and credit were to be wiped away on this day as described by author Jonathan Cahn in his New York-Times bestseller, “The Mystery of the Shemitah,” published in September 2014.

But the Shemitah can be a game-changer not only for economies and stock markets but also in geopolitics.

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The Marxist face of the Greek crisis

Soviet bloc intel defector Pacepa says Athens’ money woes only part of problem

Greece said no to the European Union and blamed capitalism for its economic crisis. The winner was Greece’s Marxist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, who named his son Ernest as tribute to Marxist mass killer Ernesto Che Guevara.

The Greeks who voted for Tsipras were just as misinformed as were the Romanians in 1967 when they voted to bring to power another two-bit Marxist Dracula, named Ceausescu. I was one of them, and I will never forgive myself for that. In December 1989, 1,104 Romanians died in order to reverse that disastrous decision.

It took many years for my native Romania – and for me – to learn that Marxism leaves nothing behind but countries looking as though they had been devastated by a hurricane, with their leaders roasting in Dante’s Inferno. All Marxist rulers have inevitably ended up in Hell – all, from Trotsky to Stalin, Tito to Zhivkov, Enver Hoxha to Mátyás Rakosi, Sékou Touré to Nyerere and Hugo Chavez. All had their days of temporary glory, but all ended in eternal disgrace.

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Best of Lev, 2012: China demonstrating will to dominate as West loses the will to resist

From Moscow, the capital of the slave country founded in 1917, I came to New York, to the 21st floor of a skyscraper.

The owners of the slave country had created their radio and television and even their own art and philosophy — in short, they created a new culture, with inevitable shortcomings.

Pre-1917 Russian culture was based on the concept of genius. The West followed, recognizing Russian writers of genius such as Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky, or Chekhov.

Post-1917 Russian culture was founded on the premise of confrontation. Before 1917, the communist hymn “The Internationale,” which had been created with the participation of Marx himself, was first secretly sung in Russia.

The message of the hymn could not be clearer: “Workers of the world, unite!” and declare war on “capitalists” by taking away their property. “Destroy the old world and build a new one, which will belong to you!” It was not a song, it was a declaration of war. Continue reading

Modern Strategy Concept (III)

BERLIN (Own report) – The elaboration of the German Ministry of Defense’s new White Paper is oriented on Cold War era scenarios. In her programmatic speech on this basic military policy document, Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen (CDU) accused Russia of following a “geostrategic hegemonic policy” and of using “military force” to “achieve its interests.” Members of the panel of experts appointed by the minister, therefore, call Russia a “threat” and demand a revival of the “deterrence” policy applied against the Soviet Union by the West. The authors of the first White Paper in 1969 had already used these terms to legitimize “limited” nuclear war against the USSR, allegedly oriented toward expansion. The subsequent military policy doctrine of the mid 1980s, even included nuclear first use to “combat the enemy’s potentials” on its own territory, because, in the event of war, Soviet territory would “not be inviolable.”

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Russia examines 1991 recognition of Baltic independence

As Vladimir Putin wants to resurrect the Soviet Empire, Russia is possibly creating a pretext for reining in the Baltic states via invasion.

 

The Russian chief prosecutor’s office is to examine whether the Soviet Union acted legally when it recognised the Baltic states’ independence in 1991.

The investigation was described as an “absurd provocation” by Lithuania’s Foreign Minister Linas Linkevicius.

Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania were occupied by Soviet communist forces in 1940. The USSR broke up in 1991. Continue reading

To Win the Second Cold War

BERLIN/MOSCOW (Own report) – A fellow of the German Council on Foreign Relations (DGAP) advocates intensifying confrontation with Russia and declaring organizations in EU countries, receiving support of Russian citizens “agents of the aggressor.” In a recent paper, published by the DGAP, Vladislav Inosemzev is calling for “the West to mobilize the necessary resources to win the second cold war.” These include political, but particularly economic measures. The steps proposed by the DGAP fellow, would result in comprehensive economic warfare against Russia and serious measures against “Putin’s apologists.” Meanwhile, the discussion of policy towards Russia continues in Berlin. Business circles insist on ending sanctions because they fear billions in business losses and the loss of a strategic market. The German government is therefore again contemplating concepts à la “transformation through trade,” according to an insider. These concepts aim at profitable business for German companies, in spite of political confrontation – as in the first Cold War.

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Spetsnaz’s First World War

Train wrecks, random oil spills, bird flu outbreaks and other pestilence seeping into America today…

As a reader, you should do yourself a favor by reading this (full version at the source) and asking yourself how much of this looks eerily familiar today and what in the near-term can potentially happen. There just might be a further underlying cause and it isn’t random.

It’s long, but very much worth your time and is highly encouraged.

The entire book is also worth your read and is crucial to understanding this chapter presented. All this is written by Viktor Suvorov, a Soviet Army Cold War-era Soviet military intelligence officer who defected to the United Kingdom.

 

I was standing on the top of an enormous skyscraper in New York when I saw King Kong. The huge gorilla surveyed Manhattan triumphantly from a dizzy height. Of course I knew it wasn’t real. But there was something both frightening and symbolic in that huge black figure.

I learnt later that the gorilla was a rubber one, that it had been decided to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the showing of the first film about King Kong by creating a gigantic inflatable model of the beast and placing it high above New York. The rubber monster was hauled up and swayed about in the wind. From the technical point of view the operation had been a real triumph by the engineers and workmen who had taken part in it. But it was not an entire success. The monster turned out to be too huge, with the result that holes appeared in its body through which the air could escape. So the gigantic muscular frame quickly collapsed into a shapeless bag. They had to pump more air into it, but the harder they pumped the bigger the holes became and the quicker the air escaped from the monster. So they had to keep on pumping….

The Communist leaders have also created a rubber monster and have hauled it up to a dizzy height. The monster is known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, and the Soviet leaders are faced with a dilemma: to expand or to decline rapidly and become a flabby sack. It is interesting to note that the Soviet Union became a superpower in the course of the most destructive war in the history of civilisation, in spite of the fact that it suffered the greatest loss of life and the greatest destruction on its own territory. It has become a military superpower and perhaps war is essential for its existence.

I do not know how or when World War Three will start. I do not know exactly how the Soviet high command plans to make use of spetsnaz in that war: the first world war in which spetsnaz will be a major contributor. I do not wish to predict the future. In this chapter I shall describe how spetsnaz will be used at the beginning of that war as I imagine it. It is not my task to describe what will happen. But I can describe what might happen.

* * *

The last month of peace, as in other wars, has an almost palpable air of crisis about it. Incidents, accidents, small disasters add to the tension. Two trains collide on a railway bridge in Cologne because the signalling system is out of order. The bridge is seriously damaged and there can be no traffic over it for the next two months.

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Ukraine bans Soviet-era symbols

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko on Friday enacted laws banning Soviet symbols and communist-era propaganda, his office said, after the measures drew strong Russian criticism when they were approved by parliament last month.

The measures come as Ukraine’s pro-Western government seeks a complete break with its Soviet past and as its soldiers fight rebels in its east allegedly supported by Russia.

The laws “prohibit Soviet symbols, condemn the communist regime, open the Soviet special services archives” and officially recognise the role of a nationalist group that fought for Ukraine’s independence in the mid-20th century. Continue reading

Putin Justifies Soviet Union’s Pact With Nazi Germany

Did he make this statement because Russia has entered, or will soon enter, another secret pact with Germany?

Over the weekend, Russian President Vladimir Putin defended the Molotov-Ribbentrop non-aggression pact the Soviet Union made with Hitler’s Nazi Germany just days before World War II broke out.

“This pact made sense in terms of guaranteeing the Soviet Union’s security,” Putin said on May 10, as he stood alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Just a week after it was signed, Germany invaded Poland, officially igniting World War II.

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US Commander: Take Nukes Off High Alert or Risk Hackers Starting a War

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Retired Gen. James Cartwright — who was vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff before retiring in 2011 — told the Associated Press that “de-alerting” nuclear weapons could reduce the likelihood of launching them in response to a false attack warning.

Just adding a little more time necessary to launch — which would do nothing to affect the deterrent value of the weapons — could make all the difference, said Cartwright, who was also the head of Strategic Command from 2004 to 2007.

Cartwright said that its an idea that should be revisited since “the sophistication of the cyberthreat has increased exponentially” in recent years. Continue reading