Meet Turkey’s New Sovereign Wealth Fund Chairman, Who Has “Now Taken Public Companies Prisoners”

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What does a man who already controls pretty much everything in his country  from politics to the judiciary to defense  give to himself? How about direct takeover of his country’s sovereign wealth fund?

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has appointed himself chairman of Turkey’s sovereign wealth fund after recent promises to exert greater influence over the economy. He’s nixed the old guard management and hand-picked their replacements, in a move his political rival, presidential candidate who lost the June election, Muharrem Ince, has aptly described as taking “public companies prisoners”.

And not to be one to break medieval sultanate tradition, he’s further named his son-in-law and Finance Minister Berat Albayrak as deputy chairman. Continue reading

Oil World Turns Upside Down as U.S. Sells Oil in Middle East

  • Cargo said to be condensate meant for Abu Dhabi’s splitters
  • U.S. exported about 700,000 barrels to U.A.E.: Census Bureau

The United Arab Emirates, a model Persian Gulf petro-state where endless billions from crude exports feed a giant sovereign wealth fund, isn’t the most obvious customer for Texan oil. Continue reading

The IMF Just Entered The Cold War, Forgives Ukraine’s Debt To Russia

Since 1947 when it really started operations, the World Bank has acted as a branch of the U.S. Defense Department, from its first major chairman John J. McCloy through Robert McNamara to Robert Zoellick and neocon Paul Wolfowitz. From the outset, it has promoted U.S. exports – especially farm exports – by steering Third World countries to produce plantation crops rather than feeding their own populations. (They are to import U.S. grain.) But it has felt obliged to wrap its U.S. export promotion and support for the dollar area in an ostensibly internationalist rhetoric, as if what’s good for the United States is good for the world. Continue reading

How Central Banks Use Gold Swaps To “Boost” Their Gold Holdings

With the specter of a “yes” outcome to the Swiss gold referendum finally being priced in by the market, and the frontrunning of the SNB’s potential 1,500 tons of gold purchases starting to move the price of gold higher, a question has emerged: is there enough physical gold to satisfy Swiss gold demand in case of a favorable outcome to the referendum. Well, as Deutsche Bank reports, that may not even be an issue. Because as the following step by step explanation demonstrates, the SNB may simply “window dress” its balance sheet with gold swaps.

So for anyone curious how banks “represent and warrant” that they have thousands of tons of physical gold when in reality they have far less if not zero physical in storage and all in “synthetic” form, here is the blow by blow. Continue reading

Chinese fund sells off Japanese investments in retaliation

The Chinese government may withdraw investments in Japan as a way to retaliate against the United States and Japan for opposing China’s newly established air defense identification zone. A shareholder listed as SSBT OD05 Omnibus China Treaty 808150, which is widely considered a Chinese sovereign fund, has reduced its Japanese investment by 600 billion yen (US$5.8 billion) between March and September this year, according to our Chinese-language sister paper Want Daily and the Tokyo-based Sankei Shimbun. Continue reading

China Just Threatened a Currency War if the Fed Doesn’t Stop Printing

The tension between Central Banks that we noted yesterday continues to worsen. This time it was China and the EU, not just Germany, that fired warning shots at the US Fed.

A senior Chinese official said on Friday that the United States should cut back on printing money to stimulate its economy if the world is to have confidence in the dollar.

Asked whether he was worried about the dollar, the chairman of China’s sovereign wealth fund, the China Investment Corporation, Jin Liqun, told the World Economic Forum in Davos: “I am a little bit worried.” Continue reading