Most Federal Agencies Wouldn’t Be Able to Bounce Back from a Sony Hack

If you’ve been following Global Geopolitics for a while, you will have come to the realization long ago that America is prepared for absolutely nothing.

The unintelligent community doesn’t even know what hit them until it’s too late. The political ‘leadership’ conducts hearings and continues to make warnings on taking action and implementing plans, but it never comes to fruition. The public for the most part doesn’t care so long as the shopping malls still remain open so they can scavenge like cockroaches through cheap plastic goods made in China.

America is in freefall in so many ways, the sword is coming to it (see also HERE), and no one except for a handful of people are really paying attention – and then a small fraction of that same handful dare to raise awareness like is done here.

God help America.

 

A file-wiping attack such as the Sony Pictures Entertainment hack could bring major federal departments to their knees, because most have no data-loss contingency plans, according to the latest figures on compliance with government cybersecurity laws.

Further, unplugging systems to contain damage, as Sony did, would impair an agency’s ability to carry out constitutional duties, some former federal cyber leaders say.

While it is debatable whether North Korea, unaffiliated hacktivists seizing an opportunity or another entity is ransacking the entertainment behemoth’s networks, one thing is clear: Sony had shoddy disaster response procedures.

The attack reportedly used so-called wiper malicious code that destroys files. After the first signs of a breach in late November, Sony officials told employees to disconnect machines from the corporate network. Continue reading

House cybersecurity chairman warns: First Sony, next the electric grid, Wall Street

Don’t limit the list of potential enemy nation-states to just N. Korea and Iran. China and Russia both have the capability and are known to have already probed American cyber defenses. By the time legislation is passed, which can sometimes take months in itself, or by the time something is implemented, it could be years later — which is too little, too late. Global Geopolitics has warned about cyberwarfare and its danger to America for years.

 

Rep. Patrick Meehan, chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security’s Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, said the Sony attack and potential for a more widespread Internet invasion by U.S. enemies demands that President Obama sign pending cybersecurity legislation into law and look to other efforts to protect homegrown technology.

“American businesses, financial networks, government agencies and infrastructure systems like power grids are at continual risk. They’re targeted not just by lone hackers and criminal syndicates, but by well-funded nation-states like North Korea and Iran. A lack of consequences for when nation states carry out cyberattacks has only emboldened these adversaries to do more harm,” he added. Continue reading

FBI warns US businesses of ‘destructive’ malware

The FBI warned U.S. businesses that hackers have used malicious software to launch destructive attacks in the United States, following a devastating cyberattack last week at Sony Pictures Entertainment.

The five-page, confidential “flash” warning issued to businesses late on Monday provided some technical details about the malicious software that was used in the attack, though it did not name the victim. Continue reading