US Army Gen. Odierno Retires amid Controversy over Iraq Remarks

Fall in line with the liars in the White House or get purged like this respected General. It remains to be seen how long Brig. Gen. Wilson Shoffner will last given his statement regarding ISIS gaining ground. All branches are being purged of those who hold the line against the Obama administration, or are Christian.

 

Army Gen. Ray Odierno retires as the 38th Chief of Staff in a ceremony Aug. 14, 2015 at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, in Arlington, Virginia. (Photo by Spc. Cody Torkelson)

 

U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno headed into retirement Friday amid controversy over his recent remarks on Iraq that were challenged by the Baghdad government, the State Department and now U.S. Central Command.

When asked if CentCom agreed with Odierno’s assessment that the campaign against Islamic militants in Iraq was essentially at a “stalemate,” Air Force Col. Pat Ryder, the chief spokesman for the command, said Friday, “No, I don’t agree with that.” Continue reading

Ousted Egyptian president Morsi sentenced to death

A Cairo court Saturday sentenced former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi to death after his conviction in a 2011 jailbreak. Sentenced with him were 120 other defendants including  Muslim Brotherhood leader, Mohamed Badie, a former parliament speaker, Mohamed Saad El-Katatny and, in absentia, treasurer Khairat el-Shater and the radical TV preacher Yusouf Qaradawi, who is based in Qatar. Continue reading

GCC oil fields and military bases threatened by the Islamic State

Saudi Arabia is facing today growing security threats amid fears that the same terrorism it established in neighboring countries, such as Iraq and Syria, will expand to reach its own territories, especially since the “Islamic State” organization has learned many lessons from the past experiences of its predecessor, al-Qaeda, with the Saudi regime.

New York – The Gulf governments seem worried these days. None of them had imagined, a few months ago, that individuals entrusted with security, people’s lives, oil fields and weapons would eventually pose the main threat to all these valuables.

Times have changed, so did the rules of the game. The new “caliph”, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, supported by countries of the Gulf that have provided him with money and arms, will not wait before striking. Al-Baghdadi may even resort to a preemptive war, this time launched from inside, not from across the borders. Continue reading

Iraq Military Out of Hellfire Missiles in Battle Against ISIS

(BAGHDAD, Iraq) — The Iraqi military ran out of Hellfire missiles six days ago, and though the U.S. is rushing more missiles into the country, Iraq has only two modified Cessna aircraft to launch them in their battle against the radical Islamic militia ISIS.

ISIS has damaged 28 tanks and shot down three helicopters, a significant percentage of the government force, and the militia killed an entire Iraqi Security Force brigade in the last couple of days at the border with Syria, which ISIS now controls.

The losses have left the Iraqi military with no offensive capability, and no real air force. Continue reading

“Security Arc” forms amidst Mideast terror


Many observers are correct in noting that the Middle East is undergoing yet another seismic shift – that the Russian-brokered destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons arsenal, a US-Iranian rapprochement, the diminished strategic value of Saudi Arabia and Israel, and a US withdrawal from Afghanistan will all contribute to changing regional dynamics considerably.

But what is this new direction? Where will it come from, who will lead it, what will define it? Continue reading

Hannity: US-Syria situation could start ‘the next World War’ [AUDIO]

Conservative talker Sean Hannity said he sees the impending U.S. conflict in Syria as something that could potentially boil over into something much larger than just isolated action to prevent the Syrian government’s use of chemical weapons — a World War. Continue reading

Iranian Endgame: Part II — The Saudi Dimension

Western powers have entered into a tense endgame with Iran over its nuclear ambitions. In the second part of this new report from the Globalist Reseach Center, energy expert Matthew Hulbert explores the critical role the China-Saudi relationship might play in its resolution.

The sanctions strategy that Western nations is enacting against Iran’s oil weath depends on more than just those Western nations. The interest (and actions) of the Gulf states and Asian nations also matters critically. Only East-West cohesion can seriously undermine Iran’s hydrocarbon economy. But getting the Saudis to wield such a brutal oil weapon to shoot down Persian nuclear plans will not be quick or easy given the stakes involved.

The al Saud are well aware of the other (more credible) hedges Iran has up its sleeve (beyond cutting off oil flows through the Strait of Hormuz). At the top of the list is stirring Shia schisms in Iraq, Bahrain, Syria, Lebanon and in Saudi Arabia itself.

The “Arab Awakening” is still sufficiently fresh in the minds of Gulf region leaders to set them on edge. Iran has dropped hints that it could have played much tougher with Riyadh over its intervention in Bahrain.

Full article: Iranian Endgame: Part II — The Saudi Dimension (The Globalist)

See also: Iranian Endgame: Part I — Sanctions and Asia (The Globalist)