Chinese stock markets suspended after shares fall 7pc

The Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges closed early after poor economic data triggered a sell-off

Trading on China’s stock markets ended early after steep losses triggered a new ‘circuit-breaker’ mechanism, installed to curb volatility.

The 7pc drop in China’s blue-chip CSI300 index prompted an automatic early closure of the Shanghai and Shenzhen stock exchanges on the first day of trading since the new safety measure was introduced.

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China Destroyed Its Stock Market in Order to Save It

When you run out of magical intervention tricks in your bag the best way to handle the inevitable is a controlled demolition. Although the crisis is far from over, it alleviates the pain for the short-term time being. You know the situation is dire when the Communist Capitalists force investors to stay in by banning all selling of stocks for months, forcing you to shoulder the loss, in order to stem the tide.

 

Last week, China destroyed its stock market in order to save it. Faced with a crash in share prices from a bubble of its own making, the Chinese government intervened ruthlessly, and recklessly, to turn those prices around. Its heavy-handed approach seemed to work, for the moment, but only by severely damaging far more important goals and ambitions.Prior to the crash, China’s stock market had enjoyed a blissful disconnect from reality. As China’s economy slowed and corporate profits declined, share prices soared, nearly tripling in just 12 months. By the peak, half the companies listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen exchanges were priced above a preposterous 85-times earnings. It was a clear warning flag — one that Chinese regulators encouraged people to ignore. Then reality caught up.

At first, when prices began to fall, the central bank responded by cutting interest rates and bank reserve requirements — measures to inject more money that had never failed to juice the market. But prices continued to fall. Then the government rallied the major brokerages to form a $19 billion fund to buy shares and waded directly into the market to buy stocks too. A few stocks rose, but most fell even further. Continue reading