Report: 340M Americans’ Personal Data Leaked

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(Photo Credit: Luis Gomes/Pexels)

 

Cybersecurity expert says the information was on a publicly accessible server.

According to a new report, a data leak of personal information has far surpassed the Equifax leaks, and could affect nearly every American.

According to WIRED magazine, cybersecurity expert Vinny Troia has discovered that the Palm Coast, Fla., based data broker Exactis exposed a database with the personal data of 340 million individual accounts onto a publicly accessible server. Anyone who knew which server to look at had immediate access to nearly 2 terabytes of personal data—including the following from an estimated 340 million people and businesses: Continue reading

FBI dispute with DNC over hacked servers may fuel doubt on Russia role

Meanwhile, President Obama is pushing America closer to war with Russia based on faulty intelligence, or what’s likely worse: fabricated intelligence.

 

fbi headquarters at night

FBI Headquarters in Washington D.C. Credit: FBI

 

The FBI may have been forced into a misstep when investigating whether Russia hacked the Democratic National Committee — the agency never directly examined the DNC servers that were breached.

Instead, the FBI had to rely on forensic evidence provided by third-party cybersecurity firm CrowdStrike, which the DNC hired to mitigate the breach.

“The FBI repeatedly stressed to DNC officials the necessity of obtaining direct access to servers and data, only to be rebuffed,” the agency said on Thursday in a statement. Continue reading

EXCLUSIVE: Signs of OPM Hack Turn Up at Another Federal Agency

The National Archives and Records Administration recently detected unauthorized activity on three desktops indicative of the same hack that extracted sensitive details on millions of current and former federal employees, government officials said Monday. The revelation suggests the breadth of one of the most damaging cyber assaults known is wider than officials have disclosed.

The National Archives’ own intrusion-prevention technology successfully spotted the so-called indicators of compromise during a scan this spring, said a source involved in the investigation, who was not authorized to speak publicly about the incident. The discovery was made soon after the Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team published signs of the wider attack — which targeted the Office of Personnel Management — to look for at agencies, according to NARA.  Continue reading