China’s Military Preparing for ‘People’s War’ in Cyberspace, Space

China’s military is preparing for war in cyberspace involving space attacks on satellites and the use of both military and civilian personnel for a digital “people’s war,” according to an internal Chinese defense report.

“As cyber technology continues to develop, cyber warfare has quietly begun,” the report concludes, noting that the ability to wage cyber war in space is vital for China’s military modernization. Continue reading

Europe Launches Key Galileo Satellites

America’s days are sadly numbered as a world leader and Europe is emptying its cargo off the ship while it still can. Europe’s infrastructure is also seeing significant improvements despite a faltering economic system. Most people would point to China as the next world leader, but they might find themselves in for a bit of a surprise. The EU combined is the world’s largest economy. Further economic intergration is being forced among EU members in order to provide a stable alternative system as well.  The creation of a European army has also been mentioned and proposed, which would be a replacement of NATO. The stage is set for a United States of Europe. Only time will tell.

The European Space Agency has successfully launched its the third and forth satellites of the Galileo global navigation satellite system, Europe’s version of America’s gps. The system’s in-orbit validation satellites are now complete. Continue reading

DIA director: China preparing for space warfare

“China’s successfully tested a direct ascent anti-satellite weapon (ASAT) missile and is developing jammers and directed-energy weapons for ASAT missions,” he said. “A prerequisite for ASAT attacks, China’s ability to track and identify satellites is enhanced by technologies from China’s manned and lunar programs as well as technologies and methods developed to detect and track space debris.”

China’s January 2007 anti-satellite missile test involved a modified DF-21 missile that destroyed a Chinese weather satellite. The blast created a debris field in space of some 10,000 pieces of space junk that could damage both manned and unmanned spacecraft.

For the U.S. military, the successful 2007 ASAT test represented a new strategic capability for China. Analysts estimate that with as many as two-dozen ASAT missiles, China could severely disrupt U.S. military operations through attacks on satellites.

Burgess said China rarely admits that its space program has direct military uses and refers to nearly all satellite launches as scientific or civil.

Additionally, Burgess said Chinese state-run enterprises “continue to proliferate space and counter-space related capabilities,” including some with direct military applications.

The Chinese, as well as the Russians, are also developing space capabilities that interfere with or disable U.S. space-based navigation, communications, and intelligence satellites.

Moreover, North Korea has demonstrated its ability to disrupt U.S. navigational capabilities through Soviet-made electronic jammers placed on vehicles near the North-South demarcation line that, when activated, were able to disrupt U.S. Global Positioning System signals up to 62 miles away.

Full article: DIA director: China preparing for space warfare (Washington Free Beacon)