Ex-FSB officer to TSN.Tyzhden: Russia involved in London, Paris attacks, ISIS

If you haven’t heard of pink, grey or red terror, you might want to do yourself a favor and read the following from Soviet defector Viktor Suvorov, entitled “Spetsnaz. The Story Behind the Soviet SAS”:

Chapter 15. Spetsnaz’s First World War

An excerpt:

All these operations — because of course none of these events is an accident — and others like them are known officially in the GRU as the ‘preparatory period’, and unofficially as the ‘overture’. The overture is a series of large and small operations the purpose of which is, before actual military operations begin, to weaken the enemy’s morale, create an atmosphere of general suspicion, fear and uncertainty, and divert the attention of the enemy’s armies and police forces to a huge number of different targets, each of which may be the object of the next attack.

The overture is carried by agents of the secret services of the Soviet satellite countries and by mercenaries recruited by intermediaries. The principal method employed at this stage is ‘grey terror’, that is, a kind of terror which is not conducted in the name of the Soviet Union. The Soviet secret services do not at this stage leave their visiting cards, or leave other people’s cards. The terror is carried out in the name of already existing extremist groups not connected in any way with the Soviet Union, or in the name of fictitious organisations.

The enemy behind the enemy is the issue. Take the San Bernardino terrorist attacks, for example, where some level of Russian connection and possible influence is apparent.

The links are there. All you need to do is connect the dots. America is under Russian attack.

Note: Most of the article will remain here, as all others needing more special attention.

 

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A former FSB officer tells TSN journalist Andriy Tsaplienko about Russian special services’ involvement in London and Paris attacks / Screenshot from tsn.ua

 

The TSN.Tyzhden weekly TV program has broadcast an interview with former Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) officer, which may trigger a real spy scandal. It has been speculated for long that the Kremlin’s puppeteers are behind terrorist attacks in Europe and the United States, but no confirmation has been presented. The experienced agent, former FSB officer specializing in terrorist organizations and counter-terrorism is now giving his testimony.

Such an interview is an extremely dangerous step for the FSB agent with high-level access, alias Yevgeniy, but he has decided to break with the past. The reason why he fled Russia is not that ideological, it is rather personal, according to TSN.Tyzhden. Continue reading

Moscow and the Nazi International

Alexander Dugin, the Russian geopolitical theorist and advisor to President Putin, has said that the twentieth century was “the century of ideology.” It was, as Nietzsche predicted, a century in which ideas (and ideologies) warred against one another. The three warring factions were, in order of their appearance: liberalism (of the Left and Right), communism (as well as social democracy), and fascism (including Hitler’s National Socialism). These three ideologies fought each other “to the death, creating, in essence, the entire dramatic and bloody political history of the twentieth century.” According to Dugin, liberalism came out the winner by the end of the last century. Yet victories of this kind are rarely permanent. In fact, Dugin tells us that liberalism has already disintegrated into “postmodernity.” With its focus on the individual, Dugin argues that liberalism has led to globalization, and globalization means that man is “freed from his ‘membership’ in a community and from any collective identity….” This happened because a mass of human beings, “comprised entirely of individuals, is naturally drawn toward universality and seeks to become global and unified.” Even now this impetus toward globalization coincides with the glorification of total freedom “and the independence of the individual from any kind of limits, including reason, morality, identity … discipline, and so on.” The result, says Dugin, is Francis Fukuyama’s “End of History.” But let us not be fooled, Dugin explains. History doesn’t really end. What has really happened, in fact, is the realization that liberalism’s triumph has been a disaster for humanity. It is a disaster for the individual because the individual has lost his moorings. It is a disaster for freedom, because we are now under the “tyranny of the majority.” It is a disaster for our economy, because spoliation is the emerging market principle. And those who wish to preserve their racial, national, or religious identities are set down as enemies by a political correctness as deluded as it is bloodless. Continue reading