What Is Moscow’s Game?

Also, don’t forget that Russian nuclear missiles are reportedly back in Cuba.

 

In an article titled, Russian General Warns of World War 3, Russia’s Nuclear Plans for The World, we read that Moscow is engaged in joint defense projects with China, India and other countries. Colonel General Leonid Ivashov is quoted in Pravda as saying that the U.S. has “not upgraded one single ballistic missile, and they do not build new ones either.” He bragged of Russia’s nuclear advantage. “This situation has changed dramatically,” Ivashov noted, “and we are standing on the brink of a war – not a cold war, but a hot war. Therefore, today Russia hastily takes efforts to rebuild the defensive capacity of the armed forces and change military doctrine.”

On a related matter, a Ukrainian analyst privately commented on the allegations of Pavel Gubarev (in East Ukraine) that Putin’s man in Chechnya, Ramzon Kadyrov, was behind the terrorist attacks in France the week before last: “If Gubarev says Kadyrov is involved in the terrorism in France, it is probably true.” He then added, as an afterthought, “Russia is full speed on the war-threat model.” Continue reading

What Happens When You Take the UK out of the EU?

If the European Union wants to make British people angry, it’s doing a stellar job. In October, after revising how they calculate gross domestic product, EU officials determined that Britain was wealthier than they thought. They abruptly handed Britain an unexpected bill for $2.7 billion, including back payment, for the EU budget. Then other EU leaders publicly castigated London for noncompliance with the EU’s liberal immigration policies. And in November, Jean-Claude Juncker—a man who openly spurns democratic norms, saying, for example, in 2011, “I am for secret, dark debates”—was appointed president of the European Commission.

Britain’s simmering resentment of the EU boiled over.

Ever since Britain joined up with Europe in 1973, it has experienced rhetorical fights, political impasses and financial catastrophes. Rather than cohering and melding into Europe, its closeness with the Continent has only caused friction. Yet it has remained steadfastly part of the EU.

But signs are increasing that this relationship is at an impasse. These days, major problems with Europe seem to come every few months, each sparking a reaction more impassioned than the last. And in 2014, the British electorate sent a strong message that it is ready to end the status quo. Continue reading