Congress to Cut Key U.S. Missile Defense System

Funding cut comes as Chinese, Iranian, Russian cruise missile threat grows

Congress is poised to significantly cut funding for a key U.S. missile defense system that is slated to be deployed against threats in the Washington, D.C., area, prompting outrage from former military leaders and defense industry insiders.

Congress is seeking to slash $25 million from JLENS, or the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor, an advanced missile detection radar system capable of finding and intercepting missiles, drones, and planes far before they reach the homeland.

Major cuts to the system are coming down the pike just as JLENS is to be deployed in the nation’s capital and integrated into the region’s air defense system. Continue reading

The Vulnerable Coast

The U.S. Navy is planning to relocate a specialized attack squadron currently stationed on the eastern seaboard, leaving Washington D.C. and other large American cities vulnerable to electronic warfare threats posed by China, Russia, Iran, and other rogue nations, sources said.

The Navy’s premier reserve electronic attack squadron, known as VAQ-209, has been ordered by the Pentagon to move from Joint Base Andrews in Maryland to Whidbey Island in Washington State, according to documents obtained by the Free Beacon.

We’re going to leave the entire east coast unprotected from electronic attack, a major vulnerability in the most critical area of this country,” one former intelligence officer for the squadron told the Free Beacon. “All of it is now unprotected.Continue reading