Martin Schultz Wants to Give Refugees the Right to Vote in German Election

 

To win the election in Germany, the SPD & Greens want to move to change the law regarding voting rights. Essentially, they want to give the refugees a right to vote. They need not be an EU citizen nor do they need to pay taxes. The mere right to vote is you happen to be there at the time. Meanwhile, the SPD has now taken the lead in polls from Merkel.  Martin Schulz, the German Social Democrats’ candidate for federal elections in September, is the very person who in the EU wants to federalize Europe and this scheme is intended to use anyone other than Germans to win the election. Continue reading

Exclusive: Dissident says he was tortured for challenging Vladimir Putin

From London to Vienna to Berlin, exiled opponents of the Russian state are increasingly fearing for their safety. Not since the Cold War have Russian operatives been accused of such violence nad [sic] intimidation abroad. The story of one man who says he was tortured for challenging Putin

On a warm morning in early August, a 68-year-old Chechen man named Said-Emin Ibragimov packed up his fishing gear and walked to his favorite spot on the west bank of the river that runs through Strasbourg, the city of his exile in eastern France. Ibragimov, who was a minister in the breakaway Chechen government in the 1990s, needed to calm his nerves, and his favorite way to relax was to watch the Ill River, a tributary of the Rhine, flow by as he waited for a fish to bite.

Ibragimov had reason to be nervous. The previous month he had accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of war crimes in a criminal complaint he had sent to the International Criminal Court (ICC) and to the Kremlin. Ibragimov had taken five years to compile evidence of what he considered crimes committed during Russia’s two wars against separatists in the Russian republic of Chechnya. During the second Chechen war, which Putin oversaw in 1999–2000, Russia bombarded the Chechen capital of Grozny and killed thousands of civilians. The U.N. later called Grozny “the most destroyed city on earth.” Continue reading

The new ‘silk road’, a rail link from China’s factories to heart of Europe

FRANKFURT: One of the world’s longest railways — a “modern-day silk road” — covers some 11,000 kilometres (24,000 miles) en route from the Chinese megacity of Chongqing to Duisburg, a key commercial hub in western Germany.

On Saturday, as part of his landmark visit to Germany, Chinese President Xi Jinping visited the last stop on the “Yuxinou” rail line, an industrial feat that promises to revolutionise transport between Europe and Asia.

Duisburg is a steel-making town of around half a million on the confluence of the Rhine and Ruhr rivers that boasts the world’s biggest inland port and is one of Germany’s most important transport and commercial hubs.

Despite the vast distances between them, it takes just 16 days for trains to travel to Duisburg from Chongqing, a sprawling metropolitan symbol of rising China with a population of more than 30 million. Continue reading

Alsace at the Forefront

The “Conseil d’Alsace”

In late November, parliamentarians of the two Rhine-region French departments (67, Bas-Rhin, and 68, Haut-Rhin) passed a resolution establishing a new “Conseil d’Alsace” (Alsace Council). The gist of this complicated administrative procedure consists of combining the two departments’ respective “Conseils Generaux” (General Councils) with the “Conseil Regional d’Alsace” (the Regional Council of Alsace),[1] to create a supervisory administrative body, to consolidate the previously scattered responsibilities, thereby, closer conflating the two departments. The new administrative unit is officially known as the “Collectivité territoriale d’Alsace,” but it is often simply referred to as the “Conseil d’Alsace” (Alsace Council). Its parliamentary assembly will be situated in Strasbourg, while the related “Executive Council” (similar to a regional government) is to be seated in Colmar. According to plans, individual “specialized administrations” will be headquartered in Mulhouse. This project, scheduled to be implemented by 2015, must now be adopted by the region’s inhabitants in a referendum, planned for April 7, 2013.[2] It is expected to pass with a large majority. In parliament, the vote on the project had resulted in a majority of 108 in favor, to five against and nine abstentions. Continue reading