Melted fuel from Fukushima disaster still missing

Before officials can tackle the challenge of removing the melted fuel, they first have to find out where the nuclear waste is located. The radiation levels at the wreckage are too high for people to investigate. In an effort to find the missing waste, engineers have developed remote control robots to withstand the radiation levels.

Even remote control robots are insufficient to probe the crippled reactors. A robot probe quit working in three hours after it was sent into Fukushima’s No. 1 plant to collect radiation levels. The mission was intended to last ten hours. The probe was designed to withstand high radiation levels. No one knows exactly why the robot stopped working. Continue reading

Officials: Fukushima Has Now Contaminated 1/3 Of The Worlds Oceans

And it’s still wildly out of control and leaking as if it began yesterday, with no end in sight.

 

A field study found that two filter cartridges were coated, which showed elements of cesium, a radioactive substance.

 

The Pacific Ocean – in fact almost one-third of the Globe – is thought to have been contaminated from the leak out from the Fukushima  Nuclear Disaster.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), seeking to promote the peaceful use of Nuclear Power, in 2011 established with the Regional Cooperative Agreement (RCA) Member States, a joint IAEA Technical Cooperation (TC) project in the region of the Pacific Ocean. It was established after the Fukushima disaster when a tsunami caused by a major earthquake on 11 March 2011, disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident. As a result a large quantity of radioactive material was admitted into the Pacific Ocean. Continue reading