Abe warns of possible military response to intruder subs

TOKYO — Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said Tuesday Tokyo could mount a military response if foreign submarines enter its territorial waters while underwater, as Japan and China continue to squabble over islands.

“These are serious acts. If submarines enter our territorial waters while underwater, we would have to implement maritime security action,” Abe told the Diet. Continue reading

Jonathan Manthorpe: Fears grow of Japan’s stimulus provoking a currency war

As Japan sets out to double its money supply to $2.71 trillion in order to propel its economy out of two decades of stagnation there are growing concerns the program will ignite a currency war in Asia.

Among Asian manufacturers such as South Korea, China and the countries of Southeast Asia concern is building to alarm. The Japanese currency, the yen, has dropped by 25 per cent in value since the election of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and the Liberal Democratic Party last November with a pledge to kickstart the economy. Continue reading

Japan has right to develop pre-emptive strike capability: defense chief

It’s already known that Japan can go nuclear within months, being they have the technology and the industry to produce. It’s also possible that they might even possess a nuclear weapons in pieces which could be assembled within weeks. Nevertheless, as this article shows, Japan seems ready to flex its muscles against China. How it will now handle Russia who is now entering the fray and doubling pressure remains to be seen. With both combined, we’re talking about going against the Shanghai Cooperation Organization.

TOKYO — Japan has the right to develop the ability to make a pre-emptive strike against an imminent attack given a changing security environment although it has no plan to do so now, the defence minister said on Thursday, days after North Korea conducted a third nuclear test.

Any sign that Japan was moving to develop such a capability in response to North Korea’s nuclear program could upset neighbors China and South Korea, which have reacted strongly in the past to suggestions it might do so.

“When an intention to attack Japan is evident, the threat is imminent, and there are no other options, Japan is allowed under the law to carry out strikes against enemy targets,” Defense Minister Itsunori Onodera told Reuters in an interview. Continue reading