Putin Justifies Soviet Union’s Pact With Nazi Germany

Did he make this statement because Russia has entered, or will soon enter, another secret pact with Germany?

Over the weekend, Russian President Vladimir Putin defended the Molotov-Ribbentrop non-aggression pact the Soviet Union made with Hitler’s Nazi Germany just days before World War II broke out.

“This pact made sense in terms of guaranteeing the Soviet Union’s security,” Putin said on May 10, as he stood alongside German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Just a week after it was signed, Germany invaded Poland, officially igniting World War II.

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Putin: Nothing Was Wrong With the Soviet Union’s Pact With Nazi Germany

Did he make this statement because Russia has entered, or will soon enter, another secret pact with Germany?

Russian President Vladimir Putin said November 4 that he sees nothing wrong with the Molotov-Ribbentrop non-aggression pact that the Soviet Union made with Adolf Hitler’s Nazi Germany just days before World War ii broke out.

The Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact was a promise of non-belligerence by either party toward the other. Just a week after it was signed, Germany invaded Poland, officially igniting World War II.

“Serious research must show that those were the foreign policy methods then,” Putin said to a group of young historians in Moscow. “The Soviet Union signed a non-aggression treaty with Germany. People say: ‘Ach, that’s bad.’ But what’s bad about that if the Soviet Union didn’t want to fight; what’s bad about it?” Continue reading