Deutsche Bank CEO suggests robots could replace half the company’s 97,000 employees

John Cryan, CEO of Deutsche Bank (Thomas Lohnes | Getty Images)

 

Some very smart people say that robots are going to steal your job.

Researchers at Oxford University estimate that 47 percent of U.S. jobs could be replaced by robots, automated technology and automated intelligence (AI) within the next 20 yearsJeff Hesse, PwC principal and U.S. people and organization co-leader, tells CNBC Make It, “The displacement is already beginning to happen.”

Elon Musk told the National Governors Association, “There certainly will be job disruption. Because what’s going to happen is robots will be able to do everything better than us.” Musk even went so far as to say that “AI is a fundamental risk to the existence of human civilization.

Continue reading

Robots poised to take over wide range of military jobs

Henrik Christensen, director of UC San Diego’s Contextual Robotics Institute. (K.C. Alfred / Union-Tribune)

 

The wave of automation that swept away tens of thousands of American manufacturing and office jobs during the past two decades is now washing over the armed forces, putting both rear-echelon and front-line positions in jeopardy.

“Just as in the civilian economy, automation will likely have a big impact on military organizations in logistics and manufacturing,” said Michael Horowitz, a University of Pennsylvania professor and one of the globe’s foremost experts on weaponized robots.

“The U.S. military is very likely to pursue forms of automation that reduce ‘back-office’ costs over time, as well as remove soldiers from non-combat deployments where they might face risk from adversaries on fluid battlefields, such as in transportation.” Continue reading

NATO’s Weakness Will Make Europe Stronger

A German blitzkrieg force in Poland symbolizes Europe’s new military direction.

To half of the alliance, the Cold War is over. To the other half, it’s back on. Seventy percent of Poles say they view Russia has a major threat, according to a Pew poll published in June. For Germany, it was a little over half that.

This dissonance is at the core of NATO’s weakness. And it was exposed in last month’s Pew poll.

Collective defense is at the heart of NATO, under its Article V. But in only two countries out of the eight surveyed, did a majority say they felt they should honor that commitment: the United States and Canada. In Poland and the United Kingdom, those in support fell only slightly short of a majority. Continue reading