Italy Threatens EU With “Nuclear Option”: Give 200,000 Migrants EU Visas, Sending Them North

 

Two weeks after Italy reacted with anger to Austria’s deployment of troops and armored vehicles to the border between the two nations, while reactivating border controls at the Brenner Pass over concerns that Italy will be unable to handle the roughly 85,000 migrants and refugees who have entered the country so far in 2017, the Italian government has threatened to retaliate in way that assures an imminent migrant crisis as well as an escalation of tensions between the two EU nations.

According to The Times, an Italian minister and a senator have threatened to issue temporary EU visas to thousands of migrants in an effort to “resolve” Italy’s escalating migrant and refugee crisis, which would then allow the refugees to travel north. The move, which has been described as a ‘nuclear option,’ would allow the nearly 200,000 migrants currently stranded in Italy, to travel across Europe using a Brussels directive loophole. Continue reading

EU prepares to unleash ‘NUCLEAR OPTION’ on Hungary: Brussels loses patience with Orban

EU Hungary

The EU is considering removing Hungary’s voting rights [GETTY]

 

THE EUROPEAN UNION is considering the extraordinary step of stripping Hungary of its voting rights in Brussels following a “serious deterioration” in the country’s stance with the bloc.

MEPs last night voted heavily in favour of taking sanctions against the state for a “serious and persistent” breach in EU values including accepting migration quotas.

These sanctions could involve reducing voting rights for EU diplomats, known around Brussels as the “nuclear option”.  Continue reading

Why Did Schauble Almost Use The “Nuclear Option” – Tim Geithner Explains

While a Greek (pre) deal in some format was largely expected this weekend (especially following the unprecedented humiliation of Greece that would allow the Troika to repay… the Troika) the biggest stunner from the past 48 hours was Schauble’s insistence (which as we subsequently learned had been coordinated with Merkel) that either Greece accepts draconian terms which will strip the country of its sovereignty, or it will suffer a 5 year “time out” from the Eurozone. Continue reading

“The Collateral Has Run Out” – JPM Warns ECB Will Use Greek “Nuclear Option” If No Monday Deal

In Athens on Friday, the ATM lines began to form in earnest.

Although estimates vary, Kathimerini, citing Greek banking officials, puts Friday’s deposit outflow at €1.7 billion. If true, that would mark a serious step up from the estimated €1.2 billion that left the banking system on Thursday and serves to underscore just how critical the ECB’s emergency decision to lift the ELA cap by €1.8 billion truly was. “Banks expressed relief following Frankfurt’s reaction, acknowledging that Friday could have ended very differently without a new cash injection,” the Greek daily said, adding that the ECB’s expectation of “a positive outcome in Monday’s meeting”, suggests ELA could be frozen if the stalemate remains after leaders convene the ad hoc summit. Bloomberg has more on the summit:

Dorothea Lambros stood outside an HSBC branch in central Athens on Friday afternoon, an envelope stuffed with cash in one hand and a 38,000 euro ($43,000) cashier’s check in the other.

She was a few minutes too late to make her deposit at the London-based bank. She was too scared to take her life-savings back to her Greek bank. She worried it wouldn’t survive the weekend.

“I don’t know what happens on Monday,” said Lambros, a 58-year-old government employee.

Continue reading

Tokyo, Seoul hold ‘ugly’ nuclear option

Should Japan choose to go nuclear, it would only be a matter of months before an ICBM can be deployed. The technology, delivery systems and the material are all there. South Korea would likely have some roadblocks going nuclear, but shouldn’t be too far behind with help from neighbors who have the same security needs.

North Korea’s nuclear weapons program is undermining regional stability in Northeast Asia, with the present crisis on the Korean Peninsula again prompting the neighboring states into seriously reconsidering their national security policies. This is particularly the case for Japan, against which North Korea has deployed, or so it is widely believed, approximately 200 Nodong missiles. Continue reading