China Buys Panama’s Largest Port

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Caption: Colón, Panama (LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Consolidating power in the Panama Canal

For more than 100 years, the Panama Canal has controlled the bulk of goods transferred between the Pacific and the Atlantic. For much of that history, this monumental feat of engineering was under the control of the United States. But this is no longer the case.

In May, Panama’s largest port was purchased by a Chinese company called Landbridge Group.

Margarita Island Port, on the canal’s Atlantic side, offers the company intimate access to one of the most important goods distribution centers in the world.

While promising to upgrade the ailing Panama facilities and offer more trade with America’s distant east coast, there is substantial reason to hesitate at the purchase of such a critical trade hub.

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Australia’s Darwin port leased to Chinese company for 99 yrs

America outmaneuvered through ‘business’ with an Australian government who considers cattle a priority over national security in Oceania and the Asia-Pacific. Being that China will now have an 80% stake in the port, they have an opportunity to exploit economic warfare on Australia as well.

 

A decision by Australia’s Northern Territory government to lease the Port of Darwin to the Chinese-owned Landbridge Group for 99 years has become a hot topic of debate among the nation’s senior defense officials, reports the state-owned Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC).

Tracey Hayes, chief executive of the Northern Territory Cattlemen’s Association, welcomed the deal as she believes it is vital to keep Australia’s busiest port for live cattle export running efficiently. Continue reading

B-1 bombers coming to Australia to deter Beijing’s South China Sea ambitions: US

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The US military plans to station B-1 strategic bombers and surveillance aircraft in Australia as part of efforts to deter Chinese ambitions in the South China Sea, a senior US government official has revealed in comments later downplayed by the Australian government.

During testimony before the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee on Wednesday, US Defence Department Assistant Secretary for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs David Shear announced that in addition to the movement of US Marine and Army units around the Western Pacific region, “we will be placing additional Air Force assets in Australia as well, including B-1 bombers and surveillance aircraft.” Continue reading

PLA’s DF-21D missiles already in service, says US report

America’s adversaries continue to modernize and build arms while it disarms and lulls itself into a false sense of security without barely any concern. If you think China (or Russia) is worried about “MAD”, you might have to ask yourself the following:

Who has hundreds of nuclear-hardened bunkers throughout their country and who doesn’t?

Who has road-mobile ICBMs and who doesn’t?

Who hasn’t had a new nuclear missile in over 30 years?

Who has their aging nuclear missiles pointed only into the ocean and who has theirs pointed only at their adversary?

If you aren’t concerned, you’re not awake.

 

A forthcoming report from the bipartisan US-China Economic and Security Review Commission indicates that two brigades of DF-21D ballistic missiles have already entered service with the People’s Liberation Army, Bill Gertz, senior editor of Washington Free Beacon, wrote in an article on Oct. 13.

Despite the strong trade and financial links between Beijing and Washington, the report said that the Communist Party government in China still views the United States as its primary adversary. China’s rapid military buildup is changing the balance of power in the Western Pacific, it said, which may bring destabilizing security competition between China and its neighbors while exacerbating regional hotspots in Taiwan, the Korean peninsula, and the East and South China seas. Continue reading