EXCLUSIVE: US Preparing to Put Nuclear Bombers Back on 24-Hour Alert

A 2014 photo of a B-52H Stratofortress based at Barksdale Air Force Base, La. (U.S. AIR FORCE / SENIOR AIRMAN CHRISTINE GRIFFITHS)

 

If the order comes, the B-52s will return to a ready-to-fly posture not seen since the Cold War.

BARKSDALE AIR FORCE BASE, La. —  The U.S. Air Force is preparing to put nuclear-armed bombers back on 24-hour ready alert, a status not seen since the Cold War ended in 1991.

That means the long-dormant concrete pads at the ends of this base’s 11,000-foot runway — dubbed the “Christmas tree” for their angular markings — could once again find several B-52s parked on them, laden with nuclear weapons and set to take off at a moment’s notice.

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The Pentagon Still Hasn’t Decided Who’s In Charge If America Comes Under Cyberattack

Is it NORTHCOM or CYBERCOM? CYBERCOM or the NSA—or both? So many agencies; so little clarity.

One of the Pentagon’s key missions is to lend a hand—or a drone—during natural disasters or other domestic emergencies. But it is unclear, in the event of of a massive data breach, which element of the Defense Department is in charge of military support, according to Congress’ watchdog agency.

In other words: When there is an Ebola virus epidemic, for example, the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs steps in to help the civilian government. But it’s not clear what military official should organize forces when there is, for instance, a hospital computer virus unleashed by Iran. Continue reading

Admiral: North Korea Can Hit U.S. With Long-Range Nuclear Missile

Pyongyang shows off new variant of mobile ICBM

North Korea is capable of hitting the United States with a long-range nuclear missile, the commander of the U.S. Northern Command said last week.

“I agree with the intel community that we assess that they have the ability, they have the weapons, and they have the ability to miniaturize those weapons, and they have the ability to put them on a rocket that can range the homelands,” said Adm. William Gortney, the Northcom commander who is also in charge of defending the United States from long-range missile attack.

“And as the defender of North America, the United States officially, in the ballistic missile defense, I think the American people expect me to take the threat seriously,” he said Wednesday at the Atlantic Council. Continue reading

Russian Bombers Flew Within 40 Miles of N. California Coast

That’s now twice in one day where the earlier incursion was within a 200 mile ADIZ, and the third such incident since June of 2014 where it Russian nuclear-capable bombers were only 50 miles off the coast of California. Let us also not forget the 16 ADIZ incursions within a 10 day timeframe back in August of last year or the bombers that threatened Guam in November that same year.

There’s a reason the Pentagon is hastily building up a cruise missile shield to defend U.S. cities.

 

Tu-95 Bear bombers intercepted off Mendocino on day Putin calls Obama

Two Russian nuclear bombers flew within 40 miles of the California coast and one of the pilots relayed a veiled threat during the Fourth of July aerial incident, defense officials said.

“Good morning American pilots, we are here to greet you on your Fourth of July Independence Day,” a Russian Tu-95 Bear bomber crew member stated over the emergency aircraft channel.

Meanwhile, Russia’s across-the-board buildup of nuclear forces and revised doctrine are increasing the danger of a nuclear war, according to a think tank report on nuclear threats. Continue reading

Pentagon Building Cruise Missile Shield To Defend US Cities From Russia

At least someone in America now realizes it’s not a game anymore, albeit a handful.

The new cruise missiles are why Russian bombers, who have come as close as 50 miles off the coast of California, don’t even need to go over American land to reach their top priority targets. One fly-by 50 miles away with nuclear-tipped cruise missiles mounted on planes would ensure Los Angeles or San Diego are erased within two minutes.

One might argue that the planes will be shot down before they could get within range. But guess what? They’ve already been in range with transponders off or none at all and the most that’s been done is politely escorting them back while sneaking in a few photos showing what a Russian bomber looks like for Facebook. Once they’ve been let in range, that’s it… it’s too late. If you think the U.S. Navy might catch them before they get in range, you might want to be reminded about how the Russians switched one of our AEGIS ships off, the USS Donald Cook, like a television.

America today is not untouchable, losing its supremacy day by day, and sadly most Americans only follow the Kardashians or their favorite NBA team.

 

The Pentagon is quietly working to set up an elaborate network of defenses to protect American cities from a barrage of Russian cruise missiles.

The plan calls for buying radars that would enable National Guard F-16 fighter jets to spot and shoot down fast and low-flying missiles. Top generals want to network those radars with sensor-laden aerostat balloons hovering over U.S. cities and with coastal warships equipped with sensors and interceptor missiles of their own.

One of those generals is Adm. William Gortney, who leads U.S. Northern Command, or NORTHCOM, and North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD. Earlier this year, Gortney submitted an “urgent need” request to put those new radars on the F-16s that patrol the airspace around Washington. Such a request allows a project to circumvent the normal procurement process.

While no one will talk openly about the Pentagon’s overall cruise missile defense plans, much of which remains classified, senior military officials have provided clues in speeches, congressional hearings and other public forums over the past year. The statements reveal the Pentagon’s concern about advanced cruise missiles being developed by Russia. Continue reading

Pentagon Moves More Communications Gear into Cheyenne Mountain

The Pentagon is beefing up its communications setup inside a hollowed-out section of Colorado’s Rocky Mountains less than a decade after it had largely abandoned the site.

The gear is being moved into Cheyenne Mountain to protect it from electromagnetic pulses, said Adm. William Gortney, commander of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD. Continue reading

Northcom: Russian Cruise Missile Threat to U.S. Grows

If you’ve no doubt in which country both Ezekiel 38, 39 depicts, then these are also likely the ‘arrows’ as described.

The sword is coming to America. By His grace and His grace alone is America getting an extension and who knows how long will last.

Get your house in order with the Lord before the fireworks fly.

 

Russia's Club K cruise missile NASIC

 

U.S. defenses ‘over-matched’ for missile threats

Russia is developing a long-range cruise missile that poses a new threat to the United States, the commander of the U.S. Northern Command warned this week.

“Russia is progressing toward its goal of deploying long-range, conventionally-armed cruise missiles with ever increasing stand-off launch distances on its heavy bombers, submarines, and surface combatants, augmenting the Kremlin’s toolkit of flexible deterrent options short of the nuclear threshold,” Adm. William Gortney, Northcom chief who heads the U.S.-Canadian North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) said Thursday. Continue reading

WEST: NORAD Head Says Russia Increasing Arctic Long Range Air Patrols

SAN DIEGO, CALIF. – While Russian military aircraft have stepped up their activity everywhere from the North Sea to the Baltic to the Black Sea in the last year they have also been spotted more frequently closer to the U.S. territory in the Arctic, the head of U.S. Northern Command (NORTHCOM) and North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) told USNI News on Tuesday.

In particular – flights of Tupolev Tu-95 Bear ‘H’ Bombers have increased recently NORTHCOM’s Adm. Bill Gortney said. Continue reading

Army Rapid Deployment Force to Secure U.S. Missile Defense Field in War Games

Large-scale U.S. military exercises held as Russia re-opens Arctic naval base

An Army rapid deployment force will practice securing the Pentagon’s strategic missile defenses base in Alaska this week as part of annual exercises involving both conventional and nuclear forces.

Defense officials said an Army Quick Reaction Force (QRF) of 55 airborne troops, along with weapons and vehicles, will parachute into Fort Greely, Alaska, on Thursday as part of exercises called Vigilant Shield.

The QRF, made up of highly-trained, extremely mobile forces, will quickly unpack vehicles and arms and move to set up a security perimeter around the Ground-Based Interceptor (GBI) field at the base—all within minutes of hitting the ground, said officials familiar with some details of the exercise. The exercises will continue through Oct. 28. Continue reading

Congress to Cut Key U.S. Missile Defense System

Funding cut comes as Chinese, Iranian, Russian cruise missile threat grows

Congress is poised to significantly cut funding for a key U.S. missile defense system that is slated to be deployed against threats in the Washington, D.C., area, prompting outrage from former military leaders and defense industry insiders.

Congress is seeking to slash $25 million from JLENS, or the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor, an advanced missile detection radar system capable of finding and intercepting missiles, drones, and planes far before they reach the homeland.

Major cuts to the system are coming down the pike just as JLENS is to be deployed in the nation’s capital and integrated into the region’s air defense system. Continue reading