Rare-Earth Market

Rare earths… A topic that was explored here years ago when it realized then the implications today’s press are just starting to wake up to.

See also:

US defense industry over-reliant on rare earth from China

Rare Earths Rouse Pentagon Fears

China warns of backlash if U.S. presses rare-earths case with WTO

 

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By monopolizing the mining of rare-earth metals, China could dictate the future of high-tech.

Beyond high-tech gadgets, rare earths play a critical role in national defense, enabling radar systems and guided missiles. Ironically, they also power clean-energy technologies, such as wind turbines and electric cars. This year, global consumption is expected to be about 155,000 tons, far more than the 45,000 tons used 25 years ago. Demand will only grow — likely at an accelerated pace — as the world tries to rein in climate change. Continue reading

Nuclear Questions, Nuclear Answers

The next administration will face a number of important nuclear policy decisions. On May 13, I invited Franklin Miller, a Principal in the Scowcroft Group, and a former top White House defense official, to discuss these matters before an audience of Congressional staff, senior administration defense and security officials, top staff from defense and security public policy organizations, defense media, defense industry officials and a number of allied embassy colleagues. It was interestingly the 1400th seminar I have hosted on the Hill since 1983 on key defense and national security matters.

Franklin Miller in his prepared remarks extensively addressed the nature of the current debate on future nuclear modernization and whether the US force was obsolete, unaffordable, destabilizing or an obstacle to further arms control. Those remarks were posted recently by Family Security Matters. Continue reading

Ex-GAO head: US debt is three times more than you think

The former U.S. comptroller general says the real U.S. debt is closer to about $65 trillion than the oft-cited figure of $18 trillion.

Dave Walker, who headed the Government Accountability Office (GAO) under Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, said when you add up all of the nation’s unfunded liabilities, the national debt is more than three times the number generally advertised. Continue reading

Russia overtaking US in cyber-warfare capabilities

If you’ve been following Global Geopolitics for a while, you already knew this day was coming. The next stage after an advantage is gained is a full-force attack shutting down everything in the United States.This doesn’t even include China, their capabilities, the damage they have already done and the damage they are going to do. You can follow these developments under the cyberwarfare category.

 

Reports coming out of Ukraine suggest that the US is falling behind Russia in terms of cyber-warfare capabilities, while the importance of such capabilities is increasing.

Ronald Pontius, deputy to the US Army Cyber Command’s commanding general was reported in National Defense as saying earlier this month:  “On one hand we can feel very positive of our pace of progress that we’re making, but when you put that in context of what the threat is and the pace of change of the threat and the significance of the threat, you can’t but come to the conclusion that we’re not making progress at the pace the threat demands.” Continue reading

China Prepares Its 172,000 Civilian Ships for War

A second article going into further detail related to a post from last week.

 

The Pentagon’s $10-billion bet gone bad

Leaders of the U.S. Missile Defense Agency were effusive about the new technology.

It was the most powerful radar of its kind in the world, they told Congress. So powerful it could detect a baseball over San Francisco from the other side of the country.

If North Korea launched a sneak attack, the Sea-Based X-Band Radar — SBX for short — would spot the incoming missiles, track them through space and guide U.S. rocket-interceptors to destroy them.

Crucially, the system would be able to distinguish between actual missiles and decoys.

SBX “represents a capability that is unmatched,” the director of the Missile Defense Agency told a Senate subcommittee in 2007.

In reality, the giant floating radar has been a $2.2-billion flop, a Los Angeles Times investigation found. Continue reading

U.S. says reduced defense role for atom bombs, Britain against ban now

America takes another step forward in national suicide whereas Great Britain, also collapsing from within, has somewhat come back to its senses in wanting to retain its existence.

 

VIENNA (Reuters) – The United States said on Tuesday it is relying less on nuclear weapons as part of its defense planning, but Britain argued against banning such arms now.

Both powers, taking part for the first time in an international conference on the humanitarian impact of atomic bombs, spoke in support of pursuing the goal of a world free of such weapons of mass destruction. Continue reading

Japan unveils largest warship since World War II

YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — Japan on Tuesday unveiled its biggest warship since World War II, a huge flat-top destroyer that has raised eyebrows in China and elsewhere because it bears a strong resemblance to a conventional aircraft carrier.

The ship, which has a flight deck that is nearly 250 meters (820 feet) long, is designed to carry up to 14 helicopters. Japanese officials say it will be used in national defense – particularly in anti-submarine warfare and border-area surveillance missions – and to bolster the nation’s ability to transport personnel and supplies in response to large-scale natural disasters, like the devastating earthquake and tsunami in 2011.

Though the ship – dubbed “Izumo” – has been in the works since 2009, its unveiling comes as Japan and China are locked in a dispute over several small islands located between southern Japan and Taiwan. For months, ships from both countries have been conducting patrols around the isles, called the Senkaku in Japan and the Diaoyutai in China. Continue reading

MONROE: The antiquation of America’s nuclear weapons

As mentioned many times here: As the list of America’s enemies continues to grow so do their threats and capacity to act upon them. The logical response would be to increase the would-be penalty for even coming close to showing intent in harming the United States. Yet, only what is counter-intuitive is the priority. Only in today’s times would people develop the illusion that total disarmament by the U.S. would be a demonstration of “moral strength.” Truth be told, there is nothing immoral about America preserving its military pre-eminence in the world.

In regards to a free world, when America (which is not untouchable) goes, so goes the rest of the free world. Any other Democratic countries are already too dependent on America for it’s security umbrella and will cave in to the demands of Russia and China (Shanghai Cooperation Organization — the new world war axis) after Washington gets hit with One Clenched Fist. It’s now 2013, a new year… and The United States is still consuming New Lies for Old.

Disarming while the world gears up a dangerous strategy

America is moving down a slippery slope, about to pass the point of no return. Our nuclear weapons capability is disintegrating. Here’s a quick assessment.

President Obama’s national goal — a world without nuclear weapons — is impossible and undesirable. Yet his administration is trying to lead the way into this fantasy land by making unilateral prohibitions, reductions, delays and cutbacks of all kinds. Today’s nuclear weapons policies — established by the Obama team in the Nuclear Posture Review — lead to nuclear weakness, rather than the nuclear strength that has kept us safe for over half a century. Continue reading

The Vulnerable Coast

The U.S. Navy is planning to relocate a specialized attack squadron currently stationed on the eastern seaboard, leaving Washington D.C. and other large American cities vulnerable to electronic warfare threats posed by China, Russia, Iran, and other rogue nations, sources said.

The Navy’s premier reserve electronic attack squadron, known as VAQ-209, has been ordered by the Pentagon to move from Joint Base Andrews in Maryland to Whidbey Island in Washington State, according to documents obtained by the Free Beacon.

We’re going to leave the entire east coast unprotected from electronic attack, a major vulnerability in the most critical area of this country,” one former intelligence officer for the squadron told the Free Beacon. “All of it is now unprotected.Continue reading

China to deploy military garrison in S China Sea

GUANGZHOU – China’s central military authority has approved to form and deploy a military garrison in the newly established city of Sansha.

Sources with the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) Guangzhou Military Command said Friday that the Central Military Commission (CMC) had authorized it to form a garrison command in the city.

The garrison command will be a division-level command under the PLA’s Hainan provincial sub-command, responsible for managing the city’s national defense mobilization, military reserves and carrying out military operations.

The PLA’s Sansha Garrison Command will be under the dual leadership of the Hainan provincial sub-command and the city’s civilian leaders.

Full article: China to deploy military garrison in S China Sea (China Daily USA)

‘Paralysis warfare’: China’s cyber focus is to cripple U.S. infrastructure

China’s cyber warfare capabilities have become sophisticated enough to easily cripple key elements of the U.S. national defense infrastructure in a pre-emptive attack, according to a new report.

The bipartisan congressional U.S.-China Economic and Security Commission released an analysis on March 8 titled “Occupying the Information High Ground: Chinese Capabilities for Computer Network Operations and Cyber Espionage.” The 136-page report details China’s spectacular advances in cyber warfare capabilities specifically targeting the U.S. military.

The Chinese call this type of preemptive cyber attack “paralysis warfare,” say the report’s authors, Bryan Krekel, Patton Adams and George Bakos, information security experts for Northrop Grumman.

“Unlike traditional air or ballistic missile strikes, network attack and exploitation in particular can be initiated prior to the start of traditional hostilities without being a de-facto cassus belli and if done properly, can be implanted with little or no attribution back to China,” the report states.

Full article: ‘Paralysis warfare’: China’s cyber focus is to cripple U.S. infrastructure (World Tribune)