Almost 8,000 Navy chiefs face ax; sailors could advance

Changing the language from ‘budget cuts’ to ‘performance checks’ is now how the US military is being purged of its senior personnel not in lockstep with the current presidency’s agenda and plan. America continues suicidally disarming while its adversaries, bent on taking the US out, are modernizing, advancing qualitatively and quantitatively with each day that passes by.

America is at the point where the Russians and Chinese are likely equal in military might and capability — or perhaps have even crossed that threshold.

 

WASHINGTON — Almost 8,000 senior enlisted personnel must go before a continuation board later this year to determine whether they can continue to serve or must retire.

The board — the first since early 2013 — will convene Oct. 27, according to a Navy document released Aug. 14.

At risk are between 7,500 and 8,000 retirement-eligible active and reserve E-7s, E-8s and E-9s with at least at least three years’ time in rate.

But there is a big upside to the process: Clearing out senior enlisted who have engaged in misconduct or whose performance has slipped noticeably makes way for hot running sailors to move up.

The board has no exceptions; even the most senior sailors — up to and including Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Mike Stevens — will have their records reviewed. Continue reading

AP Exclusive: Misconduct Forces More Soldiers Out

The purge continues. This time from the U.S. Army.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of U.S. soldiers forced out of the Army because of crimes or misconduct has soared in the past several years as the military emerges from a decade of war that put a greater focus on battle competence than on character.

Data obtained by The Associated Press shows that the number of officers who left the Army due to misconduct more than tripled in the past three years. The number of enlisted soldiers forced out for drugs, alcohol, crimes and other misconduct shot up from about 5,600 in 2007, as the Iraq war peaked, to more than 11,000 last year. Continue reading