U.S. Air Force seeks sharp growth to stay ahead of China, Russia

https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/eDiZrLYFZ.YKBNdcRJd1qA--~A/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9NDUwO2g9MjY1O2lsPXBsYW5l/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/Reuters/2018-09-17T152938Z_1_LYNXNPEE8G17L_RTROPTP_2_STORM-FLORENCE.JPG.cf.jpg

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 20th Fighter Wing, Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., taxi upon landing at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, U.S. seeking shelter from Hurricane Florence in this September 12, 2018 handout photo. Senior Airman Isaiah J. Soliz/U.S. Air Force/Handout via REUTERS

 

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Air Force is predicting it will need to grow sharply over the next decade or so, boosting the number of operational squadrons by nearly a quarter to stay ahead of increasingly muscular militaries in China and Russia, officials said.

Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson told reporters that the preliminary analysis drew partly from classified intelligence about possible threats in the 2025 to 2030 time frame, showing that the service, at its current size, would be unable to preserve America’s edge.”The Air Force is too small for what the nation is asking us to do,” Wilson told a small group of reporters ahead of a speech on Monday that will lay out her arguments. Continue reading

Russia sends aircrafts to SPY on Canadian military bases as relations deteriorate

Russia Canada spy plane military

The nuclear-capable planes were identified 700 nautical miles southwest of Anchorage [Getty]

 

RUSSIA is sending aircrafts to spy on Canadian military facilities as relations between Moscow and the West continue to deteriorate.

The unarmed planes conducted a five-day aerial surveillance mission across Canada, ending on Saturday.

Their instructions include taking photos and documenting the country’s military institutions and Canadian Forces bases.

The mission is being carried out under the Treaty on Open Skies, signed by Russia, Canada and 32 other countries in 1992, which allows each members to inspect others’ military capabilities and activities to foster an atmosphere of mutual trust.  Continue reading

Syria vows to ‘defend’ itself in ways that will ‘surprise’ the world as country prepares for military strike

Syria’s regime vowed to “defend” itself in ways that would “surprise” the world yesterday as President Bashar al-Assad’s allies prepared for a possible military strike by America and its allies.

As for the looming attack by America and its allies, Mr Muallem said: “We have two options: either to surrender, or to defend ourselves with the means at our disposal. The second choice is the best: we will defend ourselves.” Continue reading

China’s Military Preparing for ‘People’s War’ in Cyberspace, Space

China’s military is preparing for war in cyberspace involving space attacks on satellites and the use of both military and civilian personnel for a digital “people’s war,” according to an internal Chinese defense report.

“As cyber technology continues to develop, cyber warfare has quietly begun,” the report concludes, noting that the ability to wage cyber war in space is vital for China’s military modernization. Continue reading

DIA director: China preparing for space warfare

“China’s successfully tested a direct ascent anti-satellite weapon (ASAT) missile and is developing jammers and directed-energy weapons for ASAT missions,” he said. “A prerequisite for ASAT attacks, China’s ability to track and identify satellites is enhanced by technologies from China’s manned and lunar programs as well as technologies and methods developed to detect and track space debris.”

China’s January 2007 anti-satellite missile test involved a modified DF-21 missile that destroyed a Chinese weather satellite. The blast created a debris field in space of some 10,000 pieces of space junk that could damage both manned and unmanned spacecraft.

For the U.S. military, the successful 2007 ASAT test represented a new strategic capability for China. Analysts estimate that with as many as two-dozen ASAT missiles, China could severely disrupt U.S. military operations through attacks on satellites.

Burgess said China rarely admits that its space program has direct military uses and refers to nearly all satellite launches as scientific or civil.

Additionally, Burgess said Chinese state-run enterprises “continue to proliferate space and counter-space related capabilities,” including some with direct military applications.

The Chinese, as well as the Russians, are also developing space capabilities that interfere with or disable U.S. space-based navigation, communications, and intelligence satellites.

Moreover, North Korea has demonstrated its ability to disrupt U.S. navigational capabilities through Soviet-made electronic jammers placed on vehicles near the North-South demarcation line that, when activated, were able to disrupt U.S. Global Positioning System signals up to 62 miles away.

Full article: DIA director: China preparing for space warfare (Washington Free Beacon)