NATO’s Real Existential Threat: The Surrender of Western Values

 

The alliance’s elites have come down with a case of civilizational cluelessness

On January 17, Petr Pavel, a Czech army general and NATO’s military committee chairman, led meetings with his counterparts from Ukraine and Georgia, which he tweeted were “Sessions dedicated to Projecting Stability.” Yet while NATO’s collaboration with nations historically intertwined with Russia could lead to a number of possible outcomes, “stability” seems the least likely one. Like so much of what the alliance does, the purpose of these meetings is to push the alliance ever eastward.

That raises a question. Why should Americans participate in an alliance in which a general—from a minuscule military power that spends 1 percent of its GDP on defense—hosts a meeting that is more likely to provoke a catastrophic U.S.-Russia war than to prevent one? As Ted Galen Carpenter recently explained here at TAC, this is the dangerous calculus that results from interlocking the United States with so many NATO nations, including some that Moscow regards as within its sphere of influence.

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The Attack on Charlie Hebdo: A Warning to Europe Written in Blood

Yesterday’s attacks in France have tested the patience of Europe and large demonstrations immediately followed. In Germany, large demonstrations have already happened without any attacks, expressing solidarity against the islamification of German society. Throughout time, it’s been mentioned here often that all it will take is a major Islamist attack in Europe and the entire continent will take an extreme right swing. Should radical Islamists keep pushing, the threshold will eventually be found.

 

With its proximity to the Middle East, Europe is the locus of efforts to target terrorism at the West. Now is not the time, to borrow a phrase from Margaret Thatcher, to go wobbly.

The hideous attack on Charlie Hebdo, the Parisian satirical weekly, was not just an assault on France, which has gone into lockdown mode as it searches for the gunmen who murdered twelve journalists. It was also a warning to the rest of Europe, which has been grappling with its growing Muslim population. The latest issue of Hebdo itself featured an illustration about the new novel called Submission by the professional provocateur Michel Houellebecq that is set in 2022 and that depicts a France governed by an Islamic president who bans women from working.

The blunt fact is that Europe has a Muslim problem because radical Muslims have a problem with it. They are following a Leninist strategy of attempting to heighten the contradictions between Western values and Islamic ones. They also happen, more often than not, to be anti-Semitic. Writing in the Independent, Jonathan Fenby says:

As Yonathan Arfi, Vice-President of the main Jewish organisation, CRIF, noted, anti-Semitism had become “a portmanteau for a lot of angry people; radical Muslims, alienated youths from immigrant families, the far right, the far left” amid a “a process of normalisation by which anti-Semitism is being made somehow acceptable.” The French office of the Jewish Agency for Israel reported that the “climate of anti-Semitism” had led more immigrants to Israel in the first eight months of 2014 than from any other country.

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