On same day as summit U.S. rattled China, dedicated massive new Taipei compound

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The largest U.S. diplomatic compound in all of Asia opened this month in a country with whom Washington does not even have an official diplomatic relationship.

On June 12, when the world was transfixed on the Trump-Kim Nuclear Summit in Singapore, a major ceremony was taking place in Taiwan’s capital Taipei with great fanfare to mark the opening of a huge new diplomatic complex of great geopolitical significance. Continue reading

Taiwan war games simulate China invasion

 

Taiwan forces simulated an invasion by China Thursday as part of live-fire war games against a backdrop of rising tensions with Beijing.

The annual drills are Taiwan’s biggest military exercise and mocked up a scenario in which Chinese troops launched an amphibious assault.

They took place on the outlying Penghu Islands, which sit in the strait that separates Taiwan from China. Continue reading

U.S. slams Taiwan president’s planned visit to contested South China Sea island

Washington under the current Obama administration have chosen to take sides of its traditional adversaries instead of its traditional allies. Iran being the first major example with the nuclear ‘deal’, turning the entire Middle East into a powder keg and putting Israel’s existence into jeopardy. Now they’re playing into China’s hands by slamming Taiwan, an independent nation the United States is legally bound to protect and defend — despite the interpretations of the Taiwan Relations Act by those who despise Taiwan.

 

Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou’s planned trip to the Taiwanese-held island of Itu Aba in the disputed South China Sea is “extremely unhelpful” and won’t do anything to resolve disputes over the waterway, a U.S. official said on Wednesday.

Ma’s office earlier announced that the president, who steps down in May, would fly to Itu Aba on Thursday to offer Chinese New Year wishes to residents on the island, mainly Taiwanese coastguard personnel and environmental scholars. Continue reading

Xi Jinping will address Taiwan issue before 2022: scholar

Translation: There will Taiwanese unification with China before 2022, either by war or diplomacy.

 

Xi Jinping’s efforts to transform China’s image into that of a major world power must include an attempt to address the Taiwan issue before the end of his time in power, says Jin Canrong, head of the School of International Studies at Renmin University of China in Beijing.

In a media interview on Tuesday, Jin said Xi’s announcement at the UN General Assembly in New York that China will create an 8,000-strong peacekeeping standby force is an “aggressive signal” that he wants China to develop the image of a major world leader like the United States. Continue reading

Rising red tide: China’s navy, air force rapidly expanding its size and reach

Away from the Chinese military’s expanding capabilities in cyberspace and electronic warfare, Beijing is growing the size and reach of its naval fleet, advancing its air force and testing a host of new missiles, the Pentagon said Thursday.

An annual report to Congress on China’s evolving military capability concluded that the modernization was being driven in part by growing territorial disputes in the East and South China seas, as well as by Beijing’s desire to expand its presence and influence abroad. Continue reading

How the Communist Party sells Xi Jinping’s ‘Chinese Dream’

HONG KONG — To understand the attitude of China’s new leadership toward reform, you need to understand “The Chinese Dream.”

Adopted by Xi Jinping as his governing slogan at the end of last year, “The Chinese Dream” has since become ubiquitous in the People’s Republic: it’s featured in newspaper editorials, TV debates and elementary-school textbooks. It’s taught in universities, prisons and work training programs. It’s written on walls and plastered on propaganda billboards.

But what does “The Chinese Dream” mean?

That’s tougher to say. Continue reading

China plans cross-strait highways with Taiwan

Beijing drafts plan for symbolic bridge, but lacks approval from Taiwanese authorities

The mainland government has recently approved a national road project that includes two cross-strait highways linking both sides of the Taiwan Strait.

If completed, the project would be a literal and figurative bridge between the mainland and Taiwan and would mark a major milestone in cross-strait relations.

However, Taiwan’s Mainland Affairs Council, the island’s top cross-strait policy planning body, told the South China Morning Post the project had been “unilaterally worked out by mainland authorities“.

“Based on national security concerns and cross-strait interactions, we have not planned anything with such high political sensitivity and complexity,” the council said, spelling out the island’s political and security concerns. Continue reading