China, Malaysia pledge to narrow differences on South China Sea

The Philippines were yesterday, Malaysia is today. Which nation will next help shift the global order in China’s favor under an often-mentioned Asian bloc? This is only one step for Malaysia, but will prove to be another huge setback for America in Asia in the near future. Military cooperation between the two Asian nations is now in the pipeline.

 

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Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak and Premier Li Keqiang attend a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday. Photo: AFP

 

Kuala Lumpur also agrees to buy four Chinese naval vessels as part of Najib Razak’s visit to Beijing

China and Malaysia vowed to deepen cooperation on the ­disputed South China Sea on Tuesday as Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak met Premier Li ­Keqiang in Beijing.

Li called on Malaysia and China to further consolidate their relationship, especially when it came to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, as part of China’s efforts to win over member nations of the bloc.

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U.S. Warships Surround Disputed Chinese Waters, Prepared For War: “WWIII At Stake”

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Territorial disputes are a delicate thing… and potentially deadly as well.

That’s why the U.S. is backing up its positions with an ever-increasing presence of warships  in the South China Sea.

China is very touchy about these territories, and unwilling to give up what they perceive as their waters, even as a UN tribunal just denied their claims and strengthened the U.S. hand.

Indeed, the entire situation is combustible and very dangerous. Continue reading

China threatens to impose air defence zone on disputed area of South China Sea

China raised tensions in the South China Sea on Wednesday by threatening to declare an air defence identification zone (ADIZ) over disputed waters where a tribunal has quashed its legal claim.

The Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague ruled on Tuesday that China had “no legal basis” for its “nine-dash line”, which lays claim to almost all of the South China Sea. After considering a case brought by the Philippines, the court ruled against China on virtually every substantive point.

President Xi Jinping responded by saying that China would “refuse to accept” the decision.

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The ‘Inevitable War’ Between the U.S. and China

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Chinese soldiers of the People’s Liberation Army Navy stand guard in the Spratly Islands, known in China as the Nansha Islands, on February 10. The Spratlys are the most contested archipelago in the South China Sea. Stringer/Reuters

 

Roughly 15 years ago, a Chinese fighter jet pilot was killed when he collided with an American spy plane over the South China Sea. The episode marked the start of tensions between Beijing and Washington over China’s claim to the strategic waterway. So in May, when two Chinese warplanes nearly crashed into an American spy plane over the same area, many in China felt a familiar sense of nationalist outrage. “Most Chinese people hope China’s fighter jets will shoot down the next spy plane,” wrote the Global Times, China’s official nationalist mouthpiece.

Though little talked about in the West, many Chinese officials have long felt that war between Washington and Beijing is inevitable. A rising power, the thinking goes, will always challenge a dominant one. Of course, some analysts dismiss this idea; the costs of such a conflict would be too high, and the U.S., which is far stronger militarily, would almost certainly win. Yet history is riddled with wars that appeared to make no sense. Continue reading

China says it’s ready if US ‘stirs up any conflict’ in South China Sea

Make no mistake about it, regardless of how communist Chinese officials downplay or whitewash it, they want war. Internal problems (social and economic) are forcing the CCP to make a choice: Distract the nation by placing the blame outward, or own up to the failures of Communism and lose your grip on power in a violent overthrow of government.

Ask Chi Haotian, once Vice-Chairman of China’s military commision who said in his 2005 speech that conquering America is a must for China’s survival and that America must be exterminated (click HERE for a Biblical perspective).

This article should come as no surprise as it wouldn’t be the first time China has threatened war with the United States. Some years ago, Colonel Meng Xianging said there would be hand-to-hand combat with America within the next ten years.

In 2007, China also threatened to nuke the U.S. Dollar — a claim it can still make good on.

As an indicator, and as geopolitical expert JR Nyquist has warned about, When the China Bubble Bursts, war is around the corner.

 

BEIJING — China’s attempts to claim a nearly 1.4-million-square-mile swathe of open ocean are without precedent and probably without legal merit, but Beijing continues to assert its right to the economically critical zone — and increasingly puts its claims in military terms.

Speaking to a small group of reporters in Beijing on Thursday, a high-ranking Chinese official made his warning clear: The United States should not provoke China in the South China Sea without expecting retaliation.

“The Chinese people do not want to have war, so we will be opposed to [the] U.S. if it stirs up any conflict,” said Liu Zhenmin, vice minister of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. “Of course, if the Korean War or Vietnam War are replayed, then we will have to defend ourselves.”

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South China Sea: Beijing says it won’t stop building on artificial islands

Kuala Lumpur: China said on Sunday it will continue to build military and civilian facilities on its artificial islands in the disputed South China Sea and the United States was testing it by sending warships through the area.

“Building and maintaining necessary military facilities, this is what is required for China’s national defence and for the protection of those islands and reefs,” Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin told a news conference in Kuala Lumpur. Continue reading