Major Attack on Indian Army in Kashmir Puts South Asia on Crisis Footing

Indo-Pakistani tensions have been heightening over the last several months, but Sunday’s attack on an Indian Army base in Kashmir that left 17 soldiers dead has put the region in crisis mode.

The attack took place near the Line of Control (LoC) that divides Indian and Pakistani Kashmir and marks the most deadly attack against Indian security forces in over two decades. In 2002, a terrorist attack on an Indian army base in Jammu, Kashmir that killed over 30 (mostly family members of Indian Army officials), nearly led to war between Pakistan and India. Continue reading

NSA monitoring situation: MEA on `China training Pakistani troops along India border’ report

Brisbane: The Ministry of External Affairs on Saturday downplayed reports of Chinese troops training Pakistan Army personnel right across the India-Pakistan border in Jammu and Kashmir.

The MEA’s comment came a day after a news agency cited a report submitted by the Border Security Force intelligence wing to the NSA as saying that the Chinese troops have been seen training Pakistani Army men in “weapon handling” techniques bang opposite Rajouri sector of International border. Continue reading

India, Pakistan intensify cross-border firing as ties sour

SRINAGAR India – Indian and Pakistani troops intensified firing across the border over the weekend killing at least four, an Indian official said on Sunday, straining ties between the arch rivals who recently called off top-level diplomatic talks.

The Himalayan region of Kashmir has been a bone of contention between India and Pakistan since both countries became independent in 1947. They have fought three wars and came close to a fourth in 2001 and there have been regular clashes on the Line of Control that divides Indian- and Pakistan-controlled Kashmir. Continue reading

India sheds its ‘landlocked mindset’

TIMES A-CHANGIN’: The Indian navy and army are looking East and pursuing strategic defence ties with regional allies

FOUR Indian Navy ships’ voyage last month through the strategic Malacca Straits, calling at Port Klang, Da Nang and Manila, though not extraordinary, points to a significant trend.

Slowly, India seems to be shedding what critics call its “landlocked mindset” and is surveying the vast expanse of water around it.

A country conducting maritime trade from times immemorial rarely flaunted its naval power. Its navy came into being, thanks to the British East India Company only four centuries ago. Continue reading